A Diagram of Tennis Court Dimensions and Layout

A Diagram of Tennis Court Dimensions & Layout

17 replies
  1. TennisCompanion
    TennisCompanion says:

    Hey Narendra!

    Thanks so much for your question.

    International Competition
    For international competition it’s recommended that the space or distance between the baseline and the backstop should be 21 feet. The distance between the sidelines and the sidestops is recommended to be 12 feet. If you’re measuring from the net post this distance should be 9 feet because the distance from the sideline to the net post should be 3 feet.

    Recreational Play
    The recommended measurements for recreational play are slightly shorter. 18 feet between the baseline and the backstop and 10 feet from the sideline and sidestops or 7 feet from the net post.

    Hopefully this helps :) Please let me know if you have any other questions.

    PS – here’s a quick bonus. If the court is indoors the minimum recommended height of the ceiling should be 30 feet.

    All the best,
    Jon

    Reply
  2. John Wates
    John Wates says:

    Thank you for the useful info on your site. Can you tell me what the stndard length of a net should be. If the posts are 3 feet outside of the doubles court lines how much is allowed for the static hook and winder spindle on either side.

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hey John,

      Great question! Nets made for singles and doubles play are 42 feet in length. The width of a court including doubles alleys is 36 feet and the net posts are required to be placed 3 feet outside the doubles sideline. If we take the quick total (36+3+3) that gives us our 42 feet, which the net needs to cover.

      Recognizing this the net should extend right to the edge of each net post. The cable that passes through the band at the top of the net will be a few feet longer than 42 feet so that there is ample cable to wind the net so that it’s taut – this extra length can vary slightly from manufacturer.

      Hopefully this helps!

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  3. jeremy
    jeremy says:

    its an amazing site 4 sure….I have a whole team n we train each an every day….. we’ve Neva met with a strong team….. we need a challenger

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Monte,

      I love this question! It’s not super straightforward, but let’s dive into some of the details.

      Generally, courts should have a north to south orientation. The sun rises in the east and sets in the west, so this orientation keeps the sun out of the player’s eyes. However, there are two other key factors to take into consideration:

      – Time of day courts get the most use
      – Seasons when courts are used (spring, summer, winter, fall)
      – Latitude of the court’s location

      The direction of the sun changes throughout the day and year. It also varies for locations further south or north of the equator. The key is to consider these three factors and then determine the best direction to optimize play by keeping the sun out of players eyes.

      As for wind, I wouldn’t worry about it :) It’s best to focus on the direction of the sun first and foremost.

      Hopefully, this helps point you in the right direction.

      Feel free to share more details, and we can figure it out together.

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  4. Bryan
    Bryan says:

    Great resource. I was looking for tips on how to set up the singles sticks to ensure the net is 6″ higher at its edges than in the middle. Is there an official way? How do you do it?

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Bryan,

      Thanks for the note! Yes, there’s definitely an official way to make use of singles sticks.

      First off, you’ll want to make sure your net is well tensioned. Then check to make sure the height at the middle of the net is 3 feet and adjust the strap if necessary.

      Once you’ve done that, you can place the singles sticks on either side of the net 3 feet from the singles sideline, and that’s it. For reference, singles sticks are the same height as the net posts or 3.5 feet tall, and if you notice, the net posts are placed exactly 3 feet outside of the doubles sidelines, which I find is a good point of reference to help remember.

      Hopefully, that helps, let me know if I can help clarify anything.

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply

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