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20+ Famous Australian Tennis Players & Stats

Male & Female

By Jon Crim
TennisCompanion

Home of the happy slam, Australia has consistently delivered some of the world’s most dominant and talented tennis players in history.

From Margaret Court, who holds the record for the most Grand Slam titles, to Rod Laver and, more recently, three-time Grand Slam champion Ashleigh Barty, there’s much to appreciate about Australian tennis.

This guide honors the most famous and talented Australian tennis players along with key stats and achievements for you to explore, including former world No. 1s, Grand Slam champions, Hall of Famers, and the top-ranked active players on the ATP and WTA tours.

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Active Players

Although Australia isn’t quite as dominant as in the 60s and 70s, the country still consistently churns out some of the world’s best and has a rich history with the sport, including the Australian Open.

At the time of writing, Australia has five male players and two female players in the top 100 worldwide.

Male

In recent years, Nick Kyrgios and Alex de Minaur have tallied up some of the best results among men from Australia. However, plenty of others are making their mark on the ATP tour.

Here’s a list of the most successful active male tennis players who represent Australia, along with a few key stats.

Player Age Birthday Highest Rank Titles
Nick Kyrgios 27 April 27, 1995 13 7
Alex de Minaur 23 February 17, 1999 15 6
Christopher O’Connell 28 June 2, 1994 78 0
Jordan Thompson 28 April 20, 1994 43 0
Thanasi Kokkinakis 26 April 10, 1996 69 1
Jason Kubler 29 May 19, 1993 91 0
Alexei Popyrin 23 August 5, 1999 59 1
Aleksandar Vukic 26 April 6, 1996 117 0
John Millman 33 June 14, 1989 33 1
James Duckworth 31 January 21, 1992 46 0
Rinky Hijikata 21 February 23,2001 159 0
Li Tu 26 May 27, 1996 199 0
Max Purcell 24 April 3, 1998 156 0
Omar Jasika 25 May 18, 1997 229 0
Dane Sweeny 21 February 12, 2001 160 0

Without a doubt, Nick Kyrigios is the best and most famous male Australian tennis player whose active. Aside from his indisputable talent, Nick has developed a massive fan following for his impressive shot-making and record against top ten players.

Female

On the women’s side, Ashleigh Barty might be one of the few names on the WTA tour that ring a bell, but she retired in 2022 as the most successful female from Australia in recent years.

Luckily, there’s plenty more talent making their way up the ranks. Here’s a list of the top active Australian female tennis players.

Player Age Birthday Highest Rank Titles
Ajla Tomljanovic 29 May 7, 1993 33 0
Daria Saville 28 March 5, 1994 20 1
Priscilla Hon 24 May 10, 1998 118 0
Jaimee Fourlis 23 Septemer 17, 1999 147 0
Kimberly Birrell 24 April 29, 1998 154 0
Maddison Inglis 25 January 14, 1998 112 0
Olivia Gadecki 20 April 24, 2002 156 0
Astra Sharma 27 September 11, 1995 84 1
Storm Hunter 28 August 11, 1994 119 0
Lizette Cabrera 25 December 19, 1997 139 0
Arina Rodionova 33 December 15, 1989 116 0

Although Daria Saville’s highest rank and title count outshines Ajla Tomljanovic, Ajla has developed a more significant fan following, so she is a better-known player overall. More recently, she also made her way into the spotlight, defeating Serena Williams in the third round of the US Open, Serena’s final WTA appearance before retiring.

Australian Male Tennis Players

Looking back through history, Australian men, including Rod Laver, Roy Emerson, and Ken Rosewall, were some of the most influential figures in tennis who had a tremendous impact on the sport.

However, there are many more noteworthy players from Australia that you may be less familiar with who are worth exploring. In the following sections, I review each of them, including some of their most significant accomplishments that underscore their impact.

Rod Laver

Rod Laver Smiling and Holding a Racquet

Photo Credit: @Wimbledon

One of Australia’s best-known tennis players, Rod Laver, established himself as the most dominant tennis player in the 1960s with a powerful serve-and-volley game and aggressive groundstrokes.

He first started playing tennis ahead of the Open Era as an amateur in 1956 before turning pro in 1963. In 1961 he was recognized as the world’s No. 1 tennis player and achieved a career-high of No. 3 as officially recognized by the ATP’s computer rankings in 1974.

His best-known accomplishment is winning a Grand Slam twice during his career, in 1962 and 1969, which requires a player to win all four majors in a year and the only male to accomplish the feat in the Open Era. He claimed eleven Grand Slam singles and six doubles titles and is the second of four players to win each major twice.

It’s worth noting his professional status prohibited him from participating in any of these events for five years of his career. However, during that time, he won eight professional majors.

Throughout his career, he claimed 200 singles and 28 doubles titles, ending his career with a 75% win record in singles and doubles. And from 1959-1962 and again in 1973, he helped lead the Australian Davis Cup Team to victory.

Nicknamed the Rocket by his Davis Cup team captain, Rod is widely celebrated as one of the best tennis players ever. In 2000, Center Court at the National Tennis Center in Melbourne, host to the Australian Open, was renamed Rod Laver Arena, one of many recognitions of his career.

In 1981, the Tennis Hall of Fame inducted him as a member. Fans can spot Rod at many tennis tournaments throughout the year, most notably the Grand Slams.

In 2017, Rod had the Laver Cup named after him, which is an annual team competition that hosts some of the best players from around the world as a team competition.

Age 84
Birthday August 9, 1938
Retired Yes
Height 5 ft 8 in (1.73m)
Hall of Fame 1981
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 200
Grand Slam Titles 11 singles / 6 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

John Newcombe

John Newcombe Holding Wimbledon's Trophy

Photo Credit: @TennisAustralia

One of Australia’s most accomplished tennis players, John Newcombe, a.k.a., Newk, enjoyed massive success during the 60s and 70s.

Famously, he is one of only a handful of players to have achieved a world No. 1 ranking in singles in doubles, accomplishing the feat in 1967 and 1965, respectively.

John started his career as an amateur in 1960 before turning pro in 1967, which lasted until his retirement in 1981. During that time, he won seven Grand Slam titles in singles and seventeen in doubles. In total, he claimed 68 titles in singles and 33 in doubles.

His win-loss record in singles was an impressive 73% (1,072-401) after playing nearly 1,500 matches and 74% in doubles (333-115). John was also an active member of the Australian Davis Cup team, helping lead them to victory for four straight years from 1964-1967 and again in 1973.

In 1968, John famously signed on for a three-year professional contract as part of the Handsom Eight, or the original eight players that participated in the World Championship Tennis. Years later, in 1986, John was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.

In 1995 and 2000, John coached the Australian Davis Cup team and, these days, runs the John Newcombe Tennis Ranch & Academy in Texas.

Age 78
Birthday May 23, 1944
Retired Yes
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83m)
Hall of Fame 1986
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 68
Grand Slam Titles 6 singles / 17 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Ken Rosewall

Ken Rosewall Smiling

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

One of Rod Laver’s top rivals, Ken Rosewall, had an illustrious tennis career, achieving success in singles and doubles.

Ken started playing tennis as an amateur in 1950 before eventually turning pro in 1956. Throughout his career, he achieved a world No. 1 ranking and won eight singles and nine doubles Grand Slam titles. He also won fifteen professional majors, during which time he couldn’t participate in Grand Slams due to his professional status.

His career record surpasses 70% in singles, winning 1,811 of his 2,521 matches. In total, he claimed 147 titles.

Ken played on the Australian Davis Cup team throughout his career and helped lead his team to victory in 1953, 1955, 1956, and 1973. In 1980, he became a member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame and, along with Rod Laver, is widely considered one of the best to play the game.

Age 88
Birthday November 2, 1934
Retired Yes
Height 5 ft 7 in (1.70m)
Hall of Fame 1980
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 147
Grand Slam Titles 8 singles / 7 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Roy Emerson

Roy Emerson Hitting a Forehand

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

Another of Australia’s most talented tennis players in history, Roy Emerson, was a dominant force during the 60s.

He started playing tennis as an amateur in 1953 before becoming a professional in 1968. He won twelve Grand Slam singles and sixteen doubles titles during his career and, in 1961, reached the No. 1 ranking. In total, he won 77% of his singles matches with a 1,397-416 record and earned himself 110 titles, 6 of which are recognized by the ATP.

Roy helped lead the Australian Davis Cup team to victory on eight occasions. In 1982, the Tennis Hall of Fame honored him with an induction, one of several public recognitions of his achievements.

Age 86
Birthday November 3, 1936
Retired Yes
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83m)
Hall of Fame 1982
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 110
Grand Slam Titles 12 singles / 16 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Lleyton Hewitt

Lleyton Hewitt Hitting a Forehand

Photo Credit: @lleytonhewitt89

A fixture of Australian tennis, Lleyton Hewitt is well known for his speed, defensive baseline game, and shot selection, which helped propel him to the pinnacle of the sport, including the world’s No. 1 ranking in 2001.

Lleyton turned pro in 1998 and amassed thirty titles during his career, including two Grand Slam victories, one at the US Open in 2001 and another at Wimbledon in 2002. Although he never captured his home slam, he was an Australian Open finalist in 2005, where he fell to Russian tennis player Marat Safin in four sets.

A proficient volleyer, Lleyton also enjoyed success in doubles, including three career titles, a Grand Slam victory in 2000 with partner Max Mirnyi, and a career-high ranking of No. 18.

In 1999 and 2003, Lleyton helped lead Australia to Davis Cup victories. He competed in the 2008 Olympic Games, where he achieved his best Olympic result, losing in the quarterfinals to Rafael Nadal.

Since retiring from singles in 2016 and doubles in 2020, Lleyton has remained active in the world of tennis, including Davis Cup. In 2022, Lleyton was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.

Age 41
Birthday February 24, 1981
Retired Yes
Height 5 ft 10 in (1.78m)
Hall of Fame 2021
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 30
Grand Slam Titles 2 singles / 1 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Patrick Rafter

Patrick Rafter Fist Pumping

Photo Credit: @Tennis

Before Lleyton Hewitt arrived on the scene, Patrick Rafter had already established himself as a dominant Australian tennis player who is famous for his unrelenting serve and volley game.

Patrick first joined the ATP tour as a professional in 1991, and eight years later, he became the world’s No. 1 player. However, it was short-lived, only lasting a week, the shortest reign of any ATP No. 1 in history.

During his career, Rafter consistently performed as one of the best and earned himself two Grand Slam victories at the US Open in 1997 and 1998. However, he was also a semi-finalist at the Australian Open and the French Open and a finalist twice at Wimbledon.

Patrick also earned himself a doubles Grand Slam victory in 1999, partnering with Jonas Björkman of Sweden. In total, he won 11 singles titles and ten doubles titles.

In 1999, he helped Australia to their Davis Cup victory; in 2000, he represented at the Olympic games, falling in the second round.

Despite his success, Patrick’s career was relatively short, only lasting 11 years, with his retirement coming in 2002. Four years later, in 2006, he was inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame.

Age 50
Birthday December 28, 1972
Retired Yes
Height 6 ft 1 in (1.85m)
Hall of Fame 2006
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 11
Grand Slam Titles 2 singles / 1 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Nick Kyrgios

Nick Kyrgios Serving

Photo Credit: @k1ngkyrg1os

One of the most talented players to come out of Australia in recent years, Nick Kyrigios, is an intriguing player who’s as well-known for his on-court antics as he is for his tremendous talent.

Nick first joined the pro tour in 2013 and has racked up seven singles and four doubles titles, including a Grand Slam victory in 2022 with fellow countryman Thanasi Kokkinakis at the Australian Open.

Over the years, he’s made a name for himself as an incredibly entertaining player who loves to have fun on the court and is famous for hitting otherworldly trick shots that regularly make highlight reels.

One area where Nick has shined includes his performance against the big three, where he defeated each of them the first time he played against them. In total, he owns six victories over them, with one over Federer, three over Nadal, and two over Djokovic.

In 2022, Nick achieved a career-best singles result at Wimbledon, making the finals before eventually falling to Novak Djokovic. Unfortunately for Nick, ranking points did not apply to Wimbledon this year, so for now, his highest ranking stands at No. 13 due to his success in 2016.

Age 27
Birthday April 27, 1995
Retired No
Height 6 ft 4 in (1.93m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 13
Career Titles 7
Grand Slam Titles 0 singles / 1 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Pat Cash

Pat Cash Hitting a Backhand Volley

Photo Credit: @classictennishistory__

A prominent Australian player who went pro in 1982, Pat Cash established himself as a competitive serve and volleyer. If the name doesn’t ring a bell, seeing him in his trademark checkered headband might.

As an accomplished athlete, Pat won six singles and twelve doubles titles and ranked as high as No. 4 in singles and No. 6 in doubles. His best result came in 1987 when he defeated Ivan Lendl at the Wimbledon finals for his first and only Grand Slam victory. Although he came close to winning the Australian Open in 1987 and 1988, he never managed to get over the finish line, losing in the finals each time.

In 1983 and 1986, Pat Cash was a member of the Australian Davis Cup team, where he helped lead the team to victory. He also participated in the 1984 Olympic Games, falling in the first round.

Little known to many players, Pat started the tradition where players climb to their player’s box to celebrate with their team after winning, which he first did in 1987 after his Wimbledon victory.

Since retiring in 1997, Pat has worked as a TV host and commentator for CNN and the BBC, coached top players, and opened several tennis academies. More recently, he participated in the Masked Singer, a British TV series under the nickname, Bagpipes.

Age 57
Birthday May 27, 1965
Retired Yes
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 4
Career Titles 6
Grand Slam Titles 1 singles / 0 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Darren Cahill

Darren Cahill in the Media Box

Photo Credit: @dc10s

Although an accomplished Australian tennis player, who found success in singles and doubles, Darren Cahill is better known these days as a coach who has worked with some of the game’s most talented players, including Andre Agassi, Lleyton Hewitt, Simona Halep, and Jannik Sinner.

During his pro career in the 80s and 90s, he claimed two singles and thirteen doubles titles and reached a career-high of No. 22 and No. 10, respectively. Darren was a regular participant in Grand Slam events, making ten appearances and landing his best result in 1988 at the US Open. He reached the semifinals before losing to eventual champion Mats Wilander.

Darren also participated in the 1988 Olympic Games, where he lost in the second round to American Robert Seguso.

Since retiring, Darren has served as a tennis analyst with ESPN covering the Australian Open, Wimbledon, and the US Open. During the Hopman Cup and Australian Open, he also works for Channel 7 in Australia.

However, some of his crowning achievements have been helping lead three separate tennis players to Grand Slam victories, including Simona Halep at the 2018 French Open, Lleyton Hewitt at the 2001 US Open, and Andre Agassi at the 2003 Australian Open.

Age 57
Birthday October 2, 1965
Retired Yes
Height 6 ft 1 in (1.85m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 22
Career Titles 2
Grand Slam Titles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Alex de Minaur

Alex de Minaur Fist Pumping

Photo Credit: @alexdeminaur

Nicknamed the Demon, Alex de Minaur is another highly successful Australian tennis player known for his incredible speed, defensive skills, and the fact that he never backs down or gives up.

Alex joined the pro tour in 2015 and has earned himself six ATP 25 singles and one Masters 1000 doubles title since then. His best Grand Slam results include a quarterfinals appearance at the 2020 US Open and fourth-round appearances at the Australian Open and Wimbledon in 2022.

In 2022, Alex became the 109th man to represent Australia in the Davis Cup, a moment he memorialized by getting a tattoo of the number on his chest. Although his team didn’t manage to win, they did make it to the finals, where they lost to Canada.

Alex is a relatively young player with plenty of years ahead of him as a pro, so his best is still to come.

Age 23
Birthday February 17, 1999
Retired No
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 15
Career Titles 6
Grand Slam Titles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Mark Philippoussis

Mark Philippoussis Hitting a Forehand

Photo Credit: @mphilippoussis

Although Mark never achieved the level of success found by Lleyton and Patrick, he was a highly competitive and successful Australian tennis player who was well known for his big serve.

Mark turned professional in 1994 and represented his country for 14 years on the ATP tour. During that time, he claimed eleven singles and three doubles titles, reaching a career-high ranking of No. 8 in singles and No. 18 in doubles.

His best results in singles came during the 1998 US Open and 2003 at Wimbledon, where he made it to the finals on both occasions. In 1999 and 2003, he played and won the Davis Cup with the Australia team, which included Hewitt in both years, and Rafter in 1999. Mark also competed at the Olympic Games in 1996 and 2000, reaching the third round.

Since retiring, Mark has participated in two television shows and started a clothing company, As We Create.

Age 46
Birthday November 7, 1976
Retired Yes
Height 6 ft 5 in (1.96m)
Hall of Fame no
Highest Rank 8
Career Titles 11
Grand Slam Titles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Sam Groth

Sam Groth Hitting a Backhand

Photo Credit: @samgroth

Although Sam Groth never managed to break into the top 50 in the world, he made a name for himself as the player with the fastest serve on record in 2012 when he hit a 163.4 mph (263 kph) ace.

Sam first joined the ATP tour in 2006 but never managed to win a title or make it to the finals of a singles tournament. Despite that, he was a reasonably consistent performer, posting decent results at the majors, including two third-round appearances at the Australian Open and Wimbledon in 2015. On the back of these results, he achieved his best-ever ranking of No. 53 that year.

Some of his best results came as a doubles player, where he won two titles, had a winning career record, and reached the quarterfinals of the Australian Open twice and the semifinals at the French Open.

Sam also represented his country in the 2015 and 2017 Davis Cup, where Australia lost in the semifinals. In 2018, he retired after competing in the qualifiers of the Australian Open, where he lost to Taylor Fritz.

Since retiring, he’s also become a politician, sitting as a state MP in Victoria and representing the Liberal Party.

Age 35
Birthday October 19, 1987
Retired Yes
Height 6 ft 4 in (1.93m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 53
Career Titles 0
Grand Slam Titles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Bernard Tomic

Bernard Tomic Smiling

Photo Credit: @real.bernardtomic

Despite achieving a fair amount of success since joining the ATP tour in 2008, Bernard Tomic is, unfortunately, better known for his controversial behavior and legal issues than his talent on the court.

As a pro, Bernard has won four ATP titles and achieved a career-high ranking of No. 17 in 2016. Some of his best performances in singles have come at the Australian Open, where he reached the fourth round three times. He also reached Wimbledon’s quarterfinals in 2011.

Bernard represented Australia during their team’s 2015 semifinal Davis Cup run and the 2012 Olympic Games.

Age 30
Birthday October 21, 1992
Retired No
Height 6 ft 5 in (1.96m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 17
Career Titles 4
Grand Slam Titles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Honorable Mention

Although I’ve covered some of the best-known and most talented male tennis players to come out of Australia, a handful deserve honorable mention, which I’ve included below. If you’re up for it, I suggest you also take some to research and explore them too.

Player Age Birthday Retired Height Hall of Fame Highest Rank Career Titles Grand Slam Titles Olympic Medals
Norman Brooks Died 1968 (90) November 14, 1877 Yes 5 ft 11 in (1.80m) 1977 1 19 3 singles / 4 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Frank Sedgman 95 October 29, 1927 Yes 5 ft 11 in (1.80m) 1979 1 49 5 singles / 9 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Mark Woodforde 57 September 23, 1965 Yes 6 ft 2 in (1.87m) 2010 4 4 0 singles / 12 doubles 0 singles / 1 gold doubles / 1 silver doubles
Neale Fraser 89 October 2, 1933 Yes 6 ft 1 in (1.85m) 1984 1 37 3 singles / 11 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Tony Roche 77 May 17, 1945 Yes 5 ft 10 in (1.77m) 1986 2 46 1 singles / 13 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Lew Hoad Died 1994 (59) November 23, 1934 Yes 5 ft 10.5 in (1.79m) 1980 1 52 4 singles / 8 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Jack Crawford Died 1991 (83) March 22, 1908 Yes 6 ft 1 in (1.85m) 1979 1 66 6 singles / 6 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Todd Woodbridge 51 April 2, 1971 Yes 5 ft 10 in (1.78m) 2010 2 19 0 singles / 16 doubles 0 singles / 1 gold doubles / 1 silver doubles
Adrian Quist Died 1991 (78) January 23, 1913 Yes Unknown 1984 3 46 3 singles / 14 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Fred Stolle 84 October 8, 1938 Yes 6 ft 3 in (1.91m) 1985 1 39 2 singles / 10 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Anthony Wilding Died 1915 (31) October 21, 1883 Yes 6 ft 2 in (1.87m) 1978 1 123 6 singles / 5 doubles 1 bronze singles / 0 doubles
Ashley Cooper 86 September 15, 1936 Yes 6 ft 1 in (1.85m) 1991 27 1 4 singles / 4 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Gerald Patterson Died 1967 (71) December 17, 1895 Yes Unknown 1989 1 28 3 singles / 6 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
James Anderson Died 1973 (79) September 17, 1894 Yes Unknown 2013 3 15 3 singles / 2 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles

Australian Female Tennis Players

From Marget Court, the all-time leader in Grand Slam titles, to Ashleigh Barty, who helped put Australian tennis back on the map, there are plenty of noteworthy WTA players to explore.

The following list is a selection of active and retired female tennis players from Australia worth spending some time getting to know as a fan.

Margaret Court

Margaret Court Hitting a Forehand

Photo Credit: @OnThisDayShe

One of the most accomplished tennis players in history, Margaret Court is a former world No. 1 in singles and doubles who holds an astonishing 64 Grand Slam titles, 24 in singles, 19 in doubles, and 21 in mixed doubles.

Margaret started playing tennis as an amateur in 1960 and remained that way until the Open Era in 1968. At 18, she won her first Grand Slam title at the Australian Open, which she’d win seven consecutive times, eight in total. Fifteen years later, she won her final Grand Slam titles, one in mixed doubles at Wimbledon and another in Doubles at the US Open.

She first ascended to world No. 1 in singles in 1962 and in doubles in 1963, where she dominated the sport for years. Participating in the Fed Cup, she helped Australia to four wins in 1964, 1965, 1968, and 1971.

Since retiring in 1977, Margaret’s achievements have been recognized on several occasions, including a 1979 International Tennis Hall of Fame induction and in 2003, when Melbourne Park renamed one of the show courts to Margaret Court Arena.

In more recent years, Margaret has found her way into the media less for her achievements in tennis and more for her critical views on same-sex marriage, which many prominent members of the tennis community have criticized.

Age 80
Birthday July 16, 1942
Retired Yes
Height 5 ft 9 in (1.75m)
Hall of Fame 1987
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 192
Grand Slam Titles 24 singles / 19 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Evonne Goolagong

Evonne Goolagong Hitting a Backhand Volley

Photo Credit: @TennisHalloFame

Like Margaret Court, Evonne Goolagong achieved success in tennis at an early age, winning her first Grand Slam titles in singles and doubles at 19.

During her career, Evonne won 14 Grand Slam titles, seven in singles, six in doubles, and one in mixed doubles. She claimed 86 singles titles in total, 68 of which came in the Open Era. Evonne won another 46 titles in doubles, showcasing her versatility on the court.

In 1971, she was considered the world’s No. 1 player, which she also achieved in 1976 as part of the WTA tour’s rankings. Playing for her country in the Fed Cup, Evonne helped bring the title home to Australia in 1971, 1973, and 1974.

Evonne retired from tennis in 1983. Five years later, the International Tennis Hall of Fame inducted her as a member.

Age 71
Birthday July 31, 1951
Retired Yes
Height 5 ft 6 in (1.68m)
Hall of Fame 1988
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 86
Grand Slam Titles 7 singles / 6 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Ashleigh Barty

Ashleigh Barty Prepping to Serve

Photo Credit: @ashbarty

Ashleigh Barty is the best female tennis player to come out of Australia in recent history and is as well known for her friendly demeanor as her strategic all-court play, which helped lift her to the top of the game.

Ashleigh turned pro in 2010 and had a relatively modest start to her career before taking a hiatus from the sport in 2014. At the time, she suggested the tour had been “too much too quickly” and wanted to take time to experience life as a normal teenager.

In 2016, she came back to the WTA tour and quickly returned to form. Ashleigh won her first singles title in 2017. Then, shortly after, in 2018, she claimed her first Grand Slam victory at the French Open.

During her career, she also claimed titles at Wimbledon in 2021 and the Australian Open in 2022, the latter breaking a 43-year drought as the first Australian woman to lift the trophy since 1978.

In total, she won 15 singles and 12 doubles titles, including a Grand Slam Victory at the 2018 US Open with CoCo Vandeweghe. Ashleigh also represented Australia at the 2020 Olympics, winning a bronze medal in mixed doubles with John Peers. Although she never claimed a Fed Cup with her team, she did come close in 2019 as runner-up.

To the surprise of many in the tennis community, Ashleigh Barty retired in 2022 after her Australian Open title. She left the sport ranked No. 1, a feat she first achieved in June 2019.

Age 26
Birthday April 24, 1996
Retired Yes
Height 5 ft 5 in (1.66m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 15
Grand Slam Titles 3 singles / 1 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Samantha Stosur

Samantha Stosur Hitting a Backhand Volley

Photo Credit: @samstosur

A highly accomplished and versatile Australian tennis player, Samantha Stosur enjoyed a lengthy career on tour. She first went pro in 1999 and retired 23 years later in March 2022.

Although she never ascended to the world No. 1 ranking, she came close in 2011 when she reached the No. 4 spot. However, she did attain a world No. 1 ranking in doubles in 2006.

Samantha is a five-time Grand Slam champion. She won the US Open in singles in 2011 and then in doubles, the French Open in 2006, the Australian Open in 2019, and the US Open in 2005 and 2021. She also came close to winning the French Open in 2010, when she fell in the finals against Francesca Schiavone.

In total, she claimed nine singles titles and 28 doubles titles, with a winning record in both disciplines, 57%, and 64%, respectively.

Samantha often represented her country, participating in the 2012 and 2021 Olympic Games, the Fed Cup, and the Hopman Cup. Although she never posted a win, Australia made it to the finals of the Fed Cup in 2019 and 2022. Overall, she had a stellar career with incredible longevity.

Age 38
Birthday March 30, 1984
Retired Yes
Height 5 ft 9 in (1.75m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 4
Career Titles 9
Grand Slam Titles 1 singles / 4 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Ajla Tomljanovic

Ajla Tomljanovic Smiling

Photo Credit: @ajlatom

Born in Croatia, Ajla Tomljanovic started competing for Australia in 2014 when she obtained permanent residency. Four years later, after being granted Australian Citizenship, she was allowed to represent the country at all WTA events outside the Grand Slams.

Ajla first turned pro in 2009, and although she hasn’t won a title yet, she’s posted some terrific results throughout her career and has been a mainstay on the WTA tour, recently reaching her career-best ranking of No. 33 in the world in October 2022.

Her noteworthy results at Grand Slams include two quarterfinal appearances, two at Wimbledon in 2021 and 2022, and another at the US Open in 2022. On four occasions, she’s come close to winning an ATP 250 title, but she’s still chasing that accomplishment.

From 2017 to 2018, she dated Nick Kyrgios and, more recently, Italian tennis player Matteo Berrettini, two relationships that most certainly helped increase her exposure in the tennis community.

Perhaps one of the biggest wins of her career, she is famous for having beaten Serena Williams in the final match of her career. Ajla won the third-round meeting in three sets, a highly televised event, helping to raise her exposure worldwide even further.

Finally, Ajla has been one of the players showcased in the TennisChannel reality series, My Tennis Life in 2021 and 2022.

Age 29
Birthday May 7, 1993
Retired No
Height 5 ft 11 in (1.80m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 33
Career Titles 0
Grand Slam Titles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Daria Saville

Daria Saville Playing Tennis

Photo Credit: @daria_sav

Born in Russia, Daria Saville initially competed as a Russian athlete before immigrating to Australia in 2015 and, since then, has competed under the Australian flag. Her nickname is Dasha.

Throughout her career, she’s won four titles, one in singles and three in doubles. Her singles title came in 2017 when she defeated Dominika Cibulková at the Connecticut Open. That year, she attained her highest rank in singles at No. 20 worldwide.

Her best results at Grand Slam events include two fourth-round appearances at the Australian Open in 2016 and 2017. One of her more memorable results came at the 2016 Hopman Cup, where she helped lead her team to victory alongside Nick Kyrgios.

Daria changed her last name from Gavrilova to Saville after marrying her long-time partner, Luke Saville.

Age 28
Birthday March 5, 1994
Retired No
Height 5 ft 5 in (1.66m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 20
Career Titles 1
Grand Slam Titles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Astra Sharma

Astra Sharma Hitting a Forehand

Photo Credit: @astrasharma

One of the lesser-known female Australian tennis players, Astra Sharma, was born in Singapore before her parents moved to Australia. As a result, she’s only ever competed under the Australian flag.

In 2021, Astra earned her first WTA title by defeating the No. 1 seed Ons Jabeur at the Charleson Open in South Carolina, which helped push her ranking up to a career-high of No. 84 in the world.

Astra is also proficient and a regular participant in doubles, having made seven Grand Slam appearances and winning three titles with a career-high ranking of No. 91 in 2022. Her best result in the discipline came in 2019 when she reached the Australian Open finals with her partner John-Patrick Smith off of a wildcard main draw entry.

Age 27
Birthday September 11, 1995
Retired No
Height 5 ft 10 in (1.78m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 84
Career Titles 1
Grand Slam Titles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Casey Dellacqua

Casey Dellacqua Celebrating

Photo Credit: @caseydellacqua

Australian tennis player, Casey Dellacqua, is better known for her accomplishments in doubles, but she also achieved plenty of success in singles, reaching a career-high ranking of No. 26.

Casey turned pro in 2002 and, throughout her career, had a winning record of 348–214 in singles. However, she never managed to bring home a title. Her best results at Grand Slams include three fourth-round appearances, twice at the Australian Open and once at the US Open.

Impressively, she’s a seven-time Grand Slam doubles finalist, having reached the mark at all four majors. Unfortunately, she never claimed a title but won seven WTA titles outside the Grand Slams. As a result, she bested her singles ranking in doubles, reaching world No. 3 in 2016.

In 2011, Casey did make it over the hump at a Grand Slam with a win in mixed doubles partnering with Scott Lipsky at the French Open.

Casey also competed in the Fed and Hopman Cups competing for Australia but never managed to win either event. In 2008 and 2012, she also competed as an Olympic athlete.

In 2018, Casey retired after a 16-year career. Since then, she has surfaced as a tennis commentator at the Australian Open.

Age 37
Birthday February 11, 1985
Retired Yes
Height 5 ft 5 in (1.65m)
Hall of Fame No
Highest Rank 26
Career Titles 0
Grand Slam Titles 0 singles / 1 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Honorable Mention

I’ve covered some of the top talents to make their way out of Australia throughout history, but others deserve recognition. With that in mind, I’ve included several additional female Australian tennis players below.

Each contributed to the sport with significant accomplishments, so if you’re up for exploring further, I’d encourage you to look them up.

Player Age Birthday Retired Height Hall of Fame Highest Rank Career Titles Grand Slam Titles Olympic Medals
Nancye Wynne Bolton Died 2001 (84) December 2, 1916 Yes 5 t 10 in (1.78m) 2006 6 singles / 10 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Daphne Akhurst Died 1933 (29) April 22, 1903 Yes Unknown 2013 3 5 singles / 5 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Joan Hartigan Died 2000 (88) June 6, 1912 Yes Unknown No 8 3 singles / 0 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Margaret Molesworth Died 1985 (90) October 18, 1894 Yes Unknown No 10 2 singles / 3 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Esna Boyd Robertson Died 1966 (67) September 21, 1899 Yes Unknown No 10 37 1 singles / 4 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Coral McInnes Buttsworth Died 1985 (85) June 7, 1900 Yes Unknown No 2 singles / 1 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles
Kerry Melville Reid 75 August 7, 1947 Yes 5 ft 6 in (1.67m) No 7 22 1 singles / 3 doubles 0 singles / 0 doubles

Greatest of All Time

Although there are plenty of exceptional tennis players to come out of Australia, the accomplishments of Margaret Court and Rod Laver stand out from the crowd as the greatest of all time.

Margaret Court – Female

In tennis, winning a Grand Slam in any discipline is a life-changing experience that very few players ever have the pleasure of accomplishing. That’s why Margaret Court’s 64 Grand Slam titles are mindblowing.

That in of itself is credibility to be considered one of the best players to have ever lived. However, there are plenty of other reasons she’s Australia’s greatest of all time.

For starters, she ranked No. 1 in singles and doubles, a feat even fewer players achieve. Margaret also completed a Grand Slam, winning all four majors in a year. She even became a mother in 1972 and returned to play tennis, winning three of the four Grand Slams the following year.

Add four Fed Cup titles for her country and her incredible longevity, playing for 17 years from 1960-1977, before and after the Open Era, and her success is undeniable. Even her Open Era winning percentage of 91%, going 608-60, is hard to fathom.

Hands down, Margaret Court, is the greatest female tennis player to have ever come from Australia.

Age 80
Birthday July 16, 1942
Retired Yes
Height 5 ft 9 in (1.75m)
Hall of Fame 1987
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 192
Grand Slam Titles 24 singles / 19 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Rod Laver – Male

Like Margaret, many of Rod Laver’s accomplishments in tennis are unrivaled, which, combined with his kind and gentle demeanor, have made him one of the sport’s most beloved ambassadors.

Easily one of his most significant accomplishments is achieving a Grand Slam twice in two different years, once before and after the Open Era. It is a feat that no other player has accomplished to date, and he’s the only male player to have achieved it in the Open Era.

Of course, like many of the sport’s most talented athletes, he achieved success in singles in doubles. In total, he won 20 Grand Slam titles across singles, doubles, and mixed doubles.

Rod also helped lead his Davis Cup victory to wins in 1959-1962 and 1973. He also won 200 titles (72 in the open era), a number that no other player in history has matched, male or female.

By any stretch, Rod Laver is one of the greatest players of all time and certainly the best to come from Australia.

Age 84
Birthday August 9, 1938
Retired Yes
Height 5 ft 8 in (1.73m)
Hall of Fame 1981
Highest Rank 1
Career Titles 200
Grand Slam Titles 11 singles / 6 doubles
Olympic Medals 0 singles / 0 doubles

Grand Slam Singles Champions

There are four Grand Slam tournaments held yearly, including the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon, and the US Open.

Beyond being the most prestigious and offering the most prize money, they’re the most widely covered tournaments of the year, resulting in near-instant fame when a player manages to win one.

The following is a complete list of Australian tennis players who have won these tournaments since Wimbledon first started in 1877.

Year Australian Open French Open Wimbledon US Open
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905 Rodney Heath
1906 Anthony Wilding
1907 Horace Rice Norman Brookes
1908
1909 Anthony Wilding
1910 Rodney Heath Anthony Wilding
1911 Norman Brookes Anthony Wilding
1912 Anthony Wilding
1913 Ernie Parker Anthony Wilding
1914 Arthur O’Hara Wood Norman Brookes
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919 Gerald Patterson
1920 Pat O’Hara Wood
1921 Rhys Gemmell
1922 James Anderson
Margaret Molesworth
Gerald Patterson
1923 Pat O’Hara Wood
Margaret Molesworth
1924 James Anderson
Sylvia Lance Harper
1925 James Anderson
Daphne Akhurst
1926 John Hawkes
Daphne Akhurst
1927 Gerald Patterson
Esna Boyd Robertson
1928 Daphne Akhurst
1929 Daphne Akhurst
1930 Edgar Moon
Daphne Akhurst
1931 Jack Crawford
Coral McInnes Buttsworth
1932 Jack Crawford
Coral McInnes Buttsworth
1933 Jack Crawford
Joan Hartigan
Jack Crawford Jack Crawford
1934 Joan Hartigan
1935 Jack Crawford
1936 Adrian Quist
Joan Hartigan
1937 Vivian McGrath
Nancye Wynne
1938
1939 John Bromwich
Emily Hood Westacott
1940 Adrian Quist
Nancye Wynne Bolton
1941 World War II
1942 World War II
1943 World War II
1944 World War II
1945 World War II
1946 John Bromwich
Nancye Wynne Bolton
1947 Dinny Pails
Nancye Wynne Bolton
1948 Adrian Quist
Nancye Wynne Bolton
1949 Frank Sedgman
1950 Frank Sedgman
1951 Nancye Wynne Bolton Frank Sedgman
1952 Ken McGregor
Thelma Coyne Long
Frank Sedgman Frank Sedgman
1953 Ken Rosewall
1954 Mervyn Rose
Thelma Coyne Long
1955 Ken Rosewall
Beryl Penrose
1956 Lew Hoad
Mary Carter Reitano
Lew Hoad Lew Hoad Ken Rosewall
1957 Ashley Cooper Lew Hoad Malcolm Anderson
1958 Ashley Cooper Mervyn Rose Ashley Cooper Ashley Cooper
1959 Mary Carter Reitano Neale Fraser
1960 Rod Laver
Margaret Smith Court
Neale Fraser Neale Fraser
1961 Roy Emerson
Margaret Smith Court
Rod Laver Roy Emerson
1962 Rod Laver
Margaret Smith Court
Rod Laver
Margaret Smith Court
Rod Laver Rod Laver
Margaret Smith Court
1963 Roy Emerson
Margaret Smith Court
Roy Emerson
Lesley Turner Bowrey
Margaret Smith Court
1964 Roy Emerson
Margaret Smith Court
Margaret Smith Court Roy Emerson Roy Emerson
1965 Roy Emerson
Margaret Smith Court
Fred Stolle
Lesley Turner Bowrey
Roy Emerson
Margaret Smith Court
Margaret Smith Court
1966 Roy Emerson
Margaret Smith Court
Tony Roche Fred Stolle
1967 Roy Emerson Roy Emerson John Newcombe John Newcombe
1968 Bill Bowrey Ken Rosewall Rod Laver Virginia Wade
1969 Rod Laver
Margaret Smith Court
Rod Laver
Margaret Smith Court
Rod Laver Rod Laver
Margaret Smith Court
1970 Margaret Smith Court Margaret Smith Court John Newcombe
Margaret Smith Court
Ken Rosewall
Margaret Smith Court
1971 Ken Rosewall
Margaret Smith Court
Evonne Goolagong Cawley John Newcombe
Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1972 Ken Rosewall
1973 John Newcombe
Margaret Smith Court
Margaret Smith Court John Newcombe
Margaret Smith Court
1974 Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1975 John Newcombe
Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1976 Mark Edmondson Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1977 Kerry Melville Reid (Jan)
Evonne Goolagong Cawley (Dec)
1978 Chris O’Neil
1979
1980 Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987 Pat Cash
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997 Patrick Rafter
1998 Patrick Rafter
1999
2000
2001 Lleyton Hewitt
2002 Lleyton Hewitt
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011 Samantha Stosur
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021 Ashleigh Barty
2022 Ashleigh Barty

In total, Australian tennis players have won 171 Grand Slam tournaments, with Ashleigh Barty being the most recent champion, having defeated American Danielle Collins in straight sets.

World No. 1s & Hall of Famers

Any player who establishes themselves as a world No. 1 or becomes inducted into the hall of fame does so by performing exceptionally well over a consistent period, resulting in worldwide exposure and attention.

As of 2022, only 27 men and 28 women have held the No. 1 ranking, and the International Tennis Hall of Fame has only inducted 262 individuals, highlighting how rare and exceptional these achievements are.

Over the years, several Australian tennis players have found their way into the spotlight, achieving one of these feats.

No. 1s

Here’s a complete list of all the Australian tennis players who have achieved a No. 1 singles ranking in tennis. Ashleigh Barty is the most recent player from the country to earn the top spot.

Male

  • Lleyton Hewitt
  • John Newcombe
  • Patrick Rafter

Female

  • Evonne Goolagong
  • Ashleigh Barty

The following players aren’t officially recorded as world No. 1s but were widely considered the best tennis players by multiple reliable sources during their prime.

Male

  • Rod Laver
  • Ken Rosewall
  • Norman Brooks
  • Roy Emerson
  • Frank Sedgman
  • Neale Fraser
  • Lew Hoad
  • Jack Crawford
  • Fred Stolle
  • Anthony Wilding
  • Gerald Patterson

Female

  • Margaret Court

I’ll update this list as new players achieve the top ranking.

Hall of Famers

The following is a comprehensive list of all Australian tennis players who have earned a Hall of Fame induction, including Lleyton Hewitt, one of the most recent additions to receive the honor.

Male

Player Year
Lleyton Hewitt 2022
David Hall 2015
James Anderson 2013
Mark Woodforde 2010
Todd Woodbridge 2010
Own Davidson 2010
Patrick Rafter 2006
Mervyn Rose 2001
Malcolm Anderson 2000
Ken McGregor 1999
Ashley Cooper 1991
Gerald Patterson 1989
John Newcombe 1986
Tony Roche 1986
Fred Stolle 1985
Neale Fraser 1984
John Bromwich 1984
Adrian Quist 1984
Roy Emerson 1982
Rod Laver 1981
Lew Hoad 1980
Ken Rosewall 1980
Frank Sedgman 1979
Jack Crawford 1979
Harry Hopman 1978
Sir Norman Brookes 1977

Female

Player Year
Daphne Akhurst 2013
Thelma Coyne Long 2013
Nancye Wynne Bolton 2006
Lesley Turner Bowrey 1997
Hana Mandlikova 1994
Evonne Goolagong 1988
Margaret Smith Court 1979

The Hall of Fame inducts tennis players annually in July, so I’ll be sure to revisit and update this list as new players accomplish the feat.

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