Types of Tennis Racquets - Wilson Pro Staff 90 BLX

An Overview of the Different Parts of a Tennis Racquet

4 replies
  1. TennisCompanion
    TennisCompanion says:

    Hey Laurence! Thanks so much for your question and congrats on the new tennis racquet!

    This definitely sounds a bit odd, as grommets are typically inserted into the frame, so normally they won’t slide or move. However, to answer your question, grommets do not have covers. Instead, grommets at the top of the racquet head will cover the outer edge, i.e. beam, of the tennis racquet, so perhaps there was a slight miscommunication?

    What would be helpful is to know the exact tennis racquet that you have. This way I can take a closer look and make sure there isn’t something I’m missing :)

    Reply
  2. TREY
    TREY says:

    I HAVE A ( HEAD INSTINCT REV RACKET ) AND THE TENSION LEVEL MAX ON THE RACKET IS 57LBS.
    I’M GOING STRING IT WITH ( HEAD FXP TOUR ) FOR THE FIRST TIME AND I NEED TO STRING MY RACKET AT 62LBS ( 5LB OVER THE LIMIT )

    : QUESTION
    1. WILL 5LB OVER THE LIMIT DO DAMAGE TO MY RACKET
    2. WHATS THE MAX LBS YOU SUGGEST I CAN OVER THE LIMIT

    P.S THIS IS MY FIRST TIME GOING TO A MULITFILAMENT STRING…. ( I WAS HITTING WITH A POLY BUT NOW I’M GOING FOR A MUCH SOFTER STRING )

    THANKS FOR ALL YOUR HELP ……

    Reply
  3. TennisCompanion
    TennisCompanion says:

    Hey Trey, thanks for the questions! To start, here are some direct answers:

    1.) No, at 5 lbs over the recommended limit you shouldn’t have any problems at all as long as you don’t have any structural imperfections, such as cracks or significant dings
    2.) This is a little more difficult of a question to answer, but generally speaking I would not recommend going over 80 lbs on most racquets.

    A little more detail…

    One thing to note is that the recommended string tension is just that, recommended. Generally speaking most racquets can be comfortably strung above or below the recommended string tension. Typically the recommended string tension range is determined through extensive play-testing by actual players.

    Based on feedback given by play-testers, racquet manufactures will set a “recommended” string tension range. In essence, this is the range that most players will find the racquet performs well at, however if you’d like to move up a few pounds for more control or down a few pounds for a little extra power, most modern racquets shouldn’t have any structural issues with these adjustments.

    WORD OF CAUTION: Have your stringer check for any structural imperfections prior to stringing. They should be able to tell you whether or not they see any issues and if they’d be comfortable stringing at a higher tension.

    As for your new string, Head FXP Tour, is a polyester monofilament with multifilament wraps. As such, this string will perform and feel similar to a pure poly, yet provide a little more forgiveness. As such, you’re likely on the right track with stringing a few pounds tighter to achieve a similar feel, but you might consider only 2-3 pounds tighter if you were using a true poly, such as Prince Tournament Poly.

    If you’re up for it, you may want to check out two of our articles on the different types of strings and string tension, which provide some more detail on these two topics:

    https://tenniscompanion.org/types-of-tennis-string/
    https://tenniscompanion.org/tennis-string-tension/

    Good luck, and feel free to let us know if you have any additional questions.

    Reply

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