types of tennis racquets

Everything You Need to Know About the Different Types of Tennis Racquets

19 replies
  1. stephen phillips
    stephen phillips says:

    hi

    i am thinking of changing my babolat wimbledon pure drive 100 size head for one of the new pure drive models 107 or 110 and-benefit from larger sweetspot -has any one brought one and please give me their views -i am 65 flat hitting short swinging very keen but mot great player !

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi there, Stephen! I haven’t had the chance to play with either of the oversized versions of the Babolat Pure Drive, but both the 107 and 110 will certainly provide you with a larger sweet spot.

      One thing to keep in mind is that the frames are slightly longer with the 107 and 110. The standard Babolat Pure Drive is 27 inches in length, while the 107 is 27.2 inches and the 110 is 27.5 inches in length. As a result, you’re going to gain a larger sweet spot along with some more power between the larger head size and extended length.

      Hopefully, you find what you’re looking for!

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
  2. M.Umut Özdemir
    M.Umut Özdemir says:

    Hello,
    My son started tennis at the age of 6. he is 7 now , playing for 1 year. He is still using his first racket, 21inch,wilson federer. He is 125cm high now and i think it is time to change racket. What size and brand will you offer? is changing original cord effects his play? he get used to play with orange balls since he started instead of red balls. is it a handicap?

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hey, thanks for the great question. At 7 years old your son is most likely ready to move up to the next racquet size at 23 inches in length, but this recommendation is based on height. Check out the following article on racquet sizing for kids:

      Kid’s Tennis Racquet Sizing

      There’s a handy chart included in the article. All you need to do is measure your son’s height and then find his height on the chart to determine the appropriate length tennis racquet. As for brand, I think that you’ll find that most top tennis brands like Wilson, Babolat, and Head all produce great tennis racquets. At your son’s age, it tends to be more about the color of the racquet than the technologies used to develop the racquet :) I’ll usually encourage parents to involve their children in the selection process to get their buy-in. Here are a few great options:

      As for the color of the tennis balls your son was playing with I wouldn’t worry too much about that. With 10 and under tennis, kids will move from red balls (age 8 and under), to orange balls (age 9-10) and then green balls (age 11+). The goal of 10 and under tennis is to provide kids with equipment and court sizes that better match their age so that they have more fun and stay engaged but it’s certainly not a requirement and I don’t believe it will put your son at a disadvantage.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi, Pedrosyah. Thanks for the positive feedback and for stopping by the website!

      The Wilson BLX Pro Limited has a 110 square inch head size, 27.5-inch frame and has a strung weight of only 9.3 oz so I’d be more inclined to place this racquet in the power group. Have a great day!

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
  3. Benjamin Dubbink
    Benjamin Dubbink says:

    Would a Wilson Steam 99S fall in control, or power? I’ve been looking to find a new racquet because my Babolat Pure Control snapped its frame. The Steam looks nice for my style, I just want a second opinion.

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi, Benjamin! Sorry to hear about your Babolat frame – that’s a major bummer. Of course, it’s always fun to test drive new tennis racquets :)

      I’d place the Wilson Steam 99S somewhere in between control and power. I realize that might not be the exact answer you’re looking for, but compared to your old Babolat frame the following characteristics would tend to help generate a bit more power:

      • The head size is 1sq inch larger
      • It’s stiffness rating is 7 points higher
      • It’s swingweight is 20 points higher

      However, there’s one caveat… the Wilson Steam 99S has a very open string pattern with 5 fewer crosses than your old tennis racquet, which allows for increased spin and therefore arguably a greater sense of control. At the end of the day, I think you’d find the control factor relatively similar between the racquets with the Babolat edging out the Wilson in this bucket – they just access control in different ways.

      If you are seriously considering the Wilson Steam 99S I’d strongly urge you to demo the racquet first. I think you’ll find that the open string pattern is going to provide you with a pretty unique hitting experience, which may end being a love/hate scenario.

      Hopefully, that helps. If you do end up demoing the Wilson Steam I’d love for you to stop by and share your experience.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hey, Benjamin. I think it’s safe to say that if you don’t change your racquet then you’re game won’t change all that much. There are two ways I’d look at this.

      First, if you really liked your Babolat Pure Control then I might say “if it ain’t’ broke, don’t fix it” :) I’d be more inclined to focus on my technique, fitness, and mental training than worrying about finding a new racquet especially if I liked my old one. I may also be less inclined to switch my racquet if I was just about to head into a tennis season where I played competitive high school or college tennis – I’d prefer to try and make that switch during the off-season where I’d have time to get more familiar with my new racquet.

      On the other hand, if you’re not necessarily in love with your old Babolat and you’re not playing competitively with an important season coming up then the unfortunate break of your existing racquet provides you with a great opportunity to explore new racquets. Here are some questions you might use to help guide the process of finding a new tennis racquet:

      • What do you like and dislike about your old racquet?
      • What’s your level of play?
      • What style of play do you have?
      • How much would you like to spend?
      • How often do you play tennis?
      • What type of surface do you usually play on?
      • Do you have an affinity toward a certain brand of racquets?

      The combined answers of these questions would help guide the decision-making process. For example, if there were only minor dislikes of your existing racquet and it felt like your current racquet suited your style of play then it might make more sense to consider slight modifications to your existing racquet, i.e. adjusting the weight/balance with slight tweaks or selecting a different type of tennis string that would give you more power, control, spin, feel, etc…

      However, if you really didn’t like your old racquet and it generally wasn’t suited to your style and level of play then you’d want to start down the road of researching and identifying tennis racquets that matched your preferences until you had 2-3 or so racquets in mind. Then I’d strongly encourage you to demo those racquets and narrow down from there.

      Let me know if you have any follow-up questions – I’d be happy to help.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
  4. Keaton J.
    Keaton J. says:

    Hey there! I have been playing tennis for about two years now, and I’ve used the first raquet I ever purchased since. Now, my highschool season is about to start so I am looking for something that better fits my power-hitter, baseliner playing style. I’m looking for something a bit longer, due to my size, and something a bit head-heavy to get the power I need into my swings. Any suggestions for a specific racquet or brand?

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi, Keaton. Thanks for dropping by! I’d love to see if I can help. To start, it would be helpful if you could answer a few questions:

      • What tennis racquet do you currently play with? (brand, model, head size, etc…)
      • What do you like and dislike about your old racquet?
      • What’s your level of play?
      • What style of play do you have?
      • How much would you like to spend?
      • How often do you play tennis?
      • Do you primarily play on hard court?
      • Do you prefer a certain brand of racquets?

      Also, does your high school tennis team compete in the fall or does your season officially start in the spring?

      Looking forward to your reply.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
      • Keaton J.
        Keaton J. says:

        Hey Jon!
        -Currently, I play with a Head TiS2.
        -I really love the length and weight, but the head is a bit larger than I’d like.
        -Like I said, I tend to stay at the baseline and get some power into my swings.
        -I’d prefer to stay under $140
        -I play about 2 to 3 time a week.
        -I play on hard courts almost 99% of the time.
        -I’d prefer to stay Head, but some friends say I should try Babolat.
        The team doesn’t officially compete until February, but id like to get the raquet now so I can get settled in with it. I really appreciate the help!!!

        Reply
        • TennisCompanion
          TennisCompanion says:

          Awesome, thanks for your reply Keaton! I kind of figured your season wouldn’t officially start until next year, but didn’t want to make any assumptions. It looks like you’re right on track with your timing and finding a new tennis racquet.

          Before I jump in, there are two areas you will likely need to make a compromise that I figured I’d point out:

          1. The Head Ti.S2 is a super lightweight tennis racquet at only 8.6 oz that tends to be more common with oversized power oriented tennis racquets. As a result, it’s likely that if you want to go with a smaller head you’re going to have to be willing to move up slightly in the weight of your racquet. I don’t think this will be a big deal for you, but I wanted to at least point it out.
          2. Second, unless you’re buying used it’s relatively challenging to stay under the $140 mark. With that said, one of my recommendations is priced right within your budget, but hopefully you’re a bit flexible there.

          With that in mind, there are a few things I primarily took into consideration as part of the following recommendations.

          • Head size: from your comment, this appeared to be your primary dislike so I found racquets that fell below the 102 square inch head size that the Ti.S2 has, but didn’t drop too far down because you’re already used to a larger head size. In other words, I didn’t want the transition to be jarring for you.
          • Power: it seemed like you really enjoyed a big hitting game and might be disappointed with a racquet that didn’t provide you with easy access to power so I found a few racquets that would provide you with exactly that.
          • Brand: since you like Head racquets, I made two of my recommendations in the Head family of racquets, but provided a third Babolat option since you mentioned that brand too. This racquet also conveniently fell within your price range.

          Here are the three tennis racquets that I dug up for you:

          Check them out – hopefully you find something that looks interesting.

          Also, since you’re in the market for a new racquet I did want to mention the importance of the tennis string you use. Many players will spring for a new racquet and then buy the cheapest tennis strings they can find. While there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that you may not see the performance you’re looking for so I’d encourage you to do some research on your tennis strings too.

          Here are a few articles that should help you out:

          A Comprehensive Guide for the Different Types of Tennis String
          How Often Should I Change or Replace My Tennis Racquet Strings?
          Enhance Your Game with the Right Tennis String Tension
          Tennis String Gauge and Its Impact on Performance

          ~ All the best, Jon

          Reply
          • Keaton J.
            Keaton J. says:

            Thanks for the all the help!!!!
            I was actually already checking out some strings, so I appreciate those few websites. I’ll be sure to let you know if I have any more questions.

            Best wishes,
            Keaton Johnson

  5. Cindy
    Cindy says:

    Hi John,
    I just started playing tennis this summer. I am using Head (s2 larger head and longer length, titanium) . Do you think that would be a good raquet for me to use? Looking forward for your advice. Thanks

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi, Cindy! Congratulations on starting to play tennis – that’s amazing and thank you for your question :)

      As a new player, I wouldn’t worry too much about your tennis racquet just yet. The important part is your out there learning, absorbing new information and hopefully having as much as fun as possible. With that said, I do think the Head Ti.S2 is actually a great starter racquet if that’s what you have at your disposal.

      Here are a few reasons that I believe this is a good racquet for you:

      • It’s larger 102 square inch head size will allow for higher margin for error and give you a bigger sweet spot
      • At 8.6 oz the frame will be easy to manuver
      • The Longer 27.5-inch frame (.5 inches longer than a typical racquet) will help you more easily generate a bit more power

      As you get more comfortable with your game you may want to explore other tennis racquets, but for now, I think the Head Ti.S2 will work great for you.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      PS – what a coincidence… Keaton, who commented right above you, is playing with the same tennis racquet ;)

      Reply

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