Types of Tennis Racquets: Everything You Need to Know

Types of Tennis Racquets

Everything you need to know

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When purchasing or evaluating a new tennis racquet, there are a variety of factors that can be helpful to consider, including weight, length, head size, frame stiffness, and materials. Add to that the fact that there are close to 20 major racquet brands to select from, and the choices can become overwhelming quickly.

In this article, we’ll look at the three most common types of tennis racquets and help distinguish the differences between each kind and why you might want to consider one over another.

We’ve also compiled and hand-selected our list of the 20+ best tennis racquets for 2020 to help you in your decision-making process.

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Types of Racquets

Generally, tennis racquets fall into one of four categories:

  • Power Racquets
  • Control or Player’s Racquets
  • Tweener Racquets
  • Modern Player’s Racquets

The categorization is based on a player’s swing type, which is either slow and compact, fast and full, or moderate, i.e., somewhere between.

However, before we dive into each type of racquet, it’s worth pointing out that the name for each category and the players that they typically work well for are general guidelines to help players narrow their options.

Keep that in mind, as we review each type of racquet. If you’re buying your first racquet, be sure to check out our full guide on selecting a racquet.

Power Tennis Racquets

Head Titanium Ti.S6 Power Type of Tennis Racquet Example

As you may have guessed, power tennis racquets, also referred to as game improvement racquets, help players hit with more power and depth with less effort.

As a result, these types of tennis racquets are typically great options for beginners who have not yet developed the proper technique, form, and skill to generate power. At this stage, players will tend to have shorter compact strokes, which evolves with time.

An alternative name to describe this category of racquets is “game improvement,” which is a nod to the characteristics these racquets offer to help new players develop their skillset.

However, this type of tennis racquet can also be an excellent choice for smaller players, men and women who don’t have a ton of strength or players as they reach their golden years who struggle to generate the power they once were able to achieve when younger.

Common racquet characteristics of power racquets include:

  • Oversized Head: 105 in² (677.4 cm²) or greater
  • Extended Length: 27 – 29 in
  • Stiffer Frame: 66 or greater
  • Lightweight Construction: 8 – 9.5 oz

Oversized Head

A bigger racquet head size often works well for two reasons.

First, the bigger the head, the more power the racquet will provide – think trampolines. The bigger it is, the more “spring” it has, thus, the more power it can provide.

A larger head also offers more surface area for hitting, allowing for a higher margin of error, something many new players will find helpful.

An oversized head will also provide a larger sweet spot, which is the area at the center of the strings where striking the ball provides the greatest comfort and best performance.

Last but not least, a bigger head size tends to make it easier to generate topspin as the strings are separated further apart.

Extended Length

The length of a tennis racquet can also have a significant impact on a racquet’s power. The longer the racquet, the more leverage a player has when swinging, which allows the player to generate more power.

The standard size for a tennis racquet is 27 inches (68.58 cm), so extended length refers to any racquets that are longer up to 29 inches, which is the longest length allowed by the rules of tennis.

Not all power racquets feature extended lengths, but it is an attribute that many manufacturers will adjust to increase power.

Stiff Frames

Power racquets will also usually feature stiffer frames. Frame stiffness refers to the extent that a racquet bends or flexes when making contact with a tennis ball – the higher the rating, the stiffer the racquet.

A stiff frame doesn’t flex as much when it comes in contact with a tennis ball, which may seem counterintuitive, allows the ball to rebound more quickly, with greater speed and less effort.

Lightweight Construction

Lighter construction is another common characteristic of power tennis racquets, which helps make the racquet easier to maneuver.

In some cases, reducing the weight of power racquets stems from the fact that they feature larger head sizes.

All things being equal, a larger head size will increase the weight at the top of the racquet and reduce maneuverability. However, dropping the weight of the frame can counteract the extra weight in the head.

Popular Power Racquets

Here’s a selection of frames that exemplify the characteristics of power racquets.

RacquetHeadLengthStiffnessWeight
Babolat Pure Drive 110110in²
709.7cm²
27.6in
70.1cm
699.6oz
272.16g
Head Titanium Ti.S6115 in²
742 cm²
27.75in
70cm
3188.9oz
252g
Wilson Hyper Hammer 5.3110 in²
710 cm²
27.5in
70cm
3079oz
255g

Control Tennis Racquets

Wilson Pro Staff RF97 Control Type of Racquet Example

In many ways, control racquets, otherwise referred to as player’s racquets are the opposite of power racquets.

With this category of racquets, players opt for less power in exchange for control or the ability to place the ball more accurately. The key here is that the player must develop the necessary technique, skill, and fitness required to generate power.

As a result, control racquets are ideal for seasoned or professional tennis players who possess fast, full swings.

While this type of racquet caters to advanced tennis players, its characteristics can also be beneficial for hard-hitting intermediate players who are trying to rein in their game.

Common racquet characteristics include:

  • Small Head: 85-97 in² (548.4 – 625.8 cm²)
  • Standard Length: 27 in (68.58 cm)
  • Low to Mid-Range Flex: 50-70
  • Heavier Construction: 11.6 – 12.6 oz

Small Head

Control racquets have smaller head sizes, which results in less of a trampoline effect, and as a result, less power.

Moreover, a smaller racquet head will mean there is less surface area to hit the ball, which lowers a player’s margin for error and shrinks the size of the sweet spot. In other words, a player must be exact with their strokes to get the most out of this type of racquet.

Standard Length

As for length, control racquets almost always feature the standard length of 27 inches (68.58 cm).

This length provides players with the necessary amount of leverage to hit with pace, while also ensuring they have plenty of reach, and maintain adequate maneuverability at higher weights.

Flexible Frames

With many control racquets, you’ll find that the frames tend to be less stiff or more flexible. As a frame flexes when hitting a ball, it absorbs energy, so the more flex, the greater the absorption and less power.

Often the opposite is expected, i.e., as a frame bends, it’s assumed that the rebound of the frame assists in generating power. However, studies have shown this is not the case. Instead, the ball leaves the strings before the racquet has a chance to rebound.

Heavier Construction

Lastly, control racquets tend to be heavier than the rest. Higher weight serves a few different functions in control racquets:

  • Controlled Power: As a racquet’s weight increases, so does the force when striking a ball. An advanced player can, therefore, adjust the speed of their swing to deliver more or less power.
  • Stability: A frame will be less susceptible to twisting with weight distributed at the correct points in a racquet’s head, which results in a more stable, controlled feel.
  • Shock Reduction: The heavier the weight, the more shock it will absorb, which is useful for advanced players that swing hard.

It’s worth noting that while their heavier construction provides players with the above benefits, a racquet that is too heavy for a player, can also cause injury with prolonged use.

Helpful Tip
If you’re serious about your game, we’d recommend you consider all the different types of racquets as well as the pros and cons of each before you jump straight to a control racquet.

It can be tempting to purchase the type of racquets that professional players are using, but if you’re new to the sport, you’ll likely find it hurts your game more than helps.

Popular Control Racquets

Here’s a selection of frame’s that exemplify the characteristics of control racquets.

RacquetHeadLengthStiffnessWeight
Wilson Pro Staff RF9797in²
625.8cm²
27in
68.6cm
6812.6oz
357g
Yonex VCORE Pro 9797in²
625.8cm²
27in
68.6cm
6512.3oz
349g
Head Graph. 360+ Prestige MP98in²
632.3cm²
27in
68.6cm
6111.9oz
337g

Tweener (Intermediate) Tennis Racquets

Babolat Pure Drive Team Tweener Type of Racquet Example

Although we’re not a huge fan of the naming convention, which causes more confusion than helps, tweener are intermediate level racquets that sit somewhere between power and control racquets.

As a result, these racquets tend to be great all-around performers that provide a wide range of players with a blend of power and control.

For that reason, while these racquets are terrific options for intermediate players, they’re also perfectly suitable for beginners or recreational players who perhaps started learning with an inexpensive starter racquet and are looking to upgrade.

Common characteristics include:

  • Mid-sized Head: 98 – 104 in² (632.3 – 671.0 cm²)
  • Standard Length: 27 in (68.58 cm)
  • Mid-range Stiffness: 61-70
  • Mid-range Weight: 9.6 – 11.5 oz

Due to these characteristics, tweener racquets are an extremely versatile group with a wide spectrum of options to fit a variety of playing styles and skill levels.

Popular Tweener Racquets

Here’s a selection of frames that exemplify the characteristics of tweener racquets.

RacquetHeadLengthStiffnessWeight
Babolat Pure Drive Team100in²
645.2cm²
27in
68.6cm
7010.7oz
303.3g
Head Graphene 360 Speed Lite100in²
645.2cm²
27in
68.6cm
689.9oz
281g
Wilson Clash 100100in²
645.2cm²
27in
68.6cm
5511oz
312g

Modern Player’s Racquets

Babolat Pure Strike Modern Player's Type of Racquet Example

Rewind ten to twenty years, and virtually all professional tennis players were playing with control or players racquets.

However, in recent years the game and racquets pros use has continued to evolve, causing a shift in racquets preferred by some of the top pros.

These modern player’s racquets are still heavier standard length racquets, but they feature slightly larger head sizes and higher stiffness ratings, which increase power and spin potential.

Popular Modern Player’s Racquets

Here’s a selection of frames that exemplify the characteristics of modern player’s racquets.

RacquetHeadLengthStiffnessWeight
Babolat Pure Strike 16×1998in²
632.3cm²
27in
68.6cm
6611.4oz
323g
Wilson Blade 98 16×19 v798in²
632.3cm²
27in
68.6cm
6211.4oz
323g
Head Graph. 360+ Gravity MP100in²
645.2cm²
27in
68.6cm
6211oz
312g

What Type of Tennis Racquet Should You Buy?

Figuring out which racquet to buy is one of the most common questions beginners ask when getting started and learning how to play tennis.

Hopefully, the above sections of this guide have helped start to point you in the right direction. However, to be sure, we’ll provide some more concrete recommendations in this section.

Beginner

If you’re a beginner who has never played tennis before or you’ve hit a few times, but you’re still just getting started, we’d recommend you opt for a power or tweener racquet.

Athletes with great hand-eye coordination gained from playing other sports will be great candidates for considering tweener racquets. Here’s a list of favorite racquets for beginners to get you started.

However, it’s worth noting that you don’t need to spring all that money at first if you don’t have the budget, you don’t plan on taking the sport too seriously, or you’re unsure if you’re going to enjoy it.

If you fall into any of those categories, then an inexpensive tennis racquet might be a great option.

Intermediate

If you’ve been playing tennis for a while and your skills and technique are beginning to mature, then it may be time to experiment with a tweener racquet if you didn’t start there as a beginner.

Although it may be tempting, we’d recommend you stay away from players or control racquets at this stage and allow your game to continue to mature before making the switch, if you ever do at all.

Advanced

Most advanced players will have carefully selected their tennis racquet well before they reach this level. However, intermediate players that are finding success on the court and moving up to an advanced level will want to start to consider a custom tennis racquet.

At the higher levels of the game, small tweaks to a player’s racquet can have a fairly substantial impact on performance. Moreover, ensuring all of your racquets match perfectly can help ensure a seamless transition as you switch racquets during a match.

Finding the Right Fit

The more honest you are with your skill level, and the better you understand your style of play, the more likely you’ll be to purchase the type of racquet that helps you maximize your performance, reduces the likelihood of injury, and helps you have more fun on the court.

If possible, work with a tennis pro at your local tennis club. More often then not, they are equipped and experienced in helping players find the right tennis racquet. Furthermore, they can get out on the court with you to understand your style and level of play and thus help you match you with the right racquet.

When working with a tennis pro, remember that not all pros are created equal. Be sure to seek out someone who has the credentials, experience, and is willing to take time to help you find the right racquet.

Also, be cautious of “club racquets.” Often, tennis clubs carry a limited selection of brands and styles of tennis racquets that cater to the types of players they most frequently see at their club or because they have a special relationship with a dealer. As a result, they’ll often be looking to push those racquets to clear out existing stock and make room for new models.

A reputable pro might start with the racquets their club carries because they have them directly at their disposal but will not limit themselves to these types of racquets if necessary to find the right fit.

You may also find it helpful to review the different parts of a tennis racquet, so you have a general understanding of how each component impacts racquet performance.

Wrapping Up

With hundreds of tennis racquets on the market, understanding the different types can help guide your decision making and narrow your options to find a great fit.

To that end, we hope this resource has helped point you in the right direction. Of course, if you need help, feel free to drop a comment below – we’d love to hear from you.

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51 replies
  1. stephen phillips
    stephen phillips says:

    hi

    i am thinking of changing my babolat wimbledon pure drive 100 size head for one of the new pure drive models 107 or 110 and-benefit from larger sweetspot -has any one brought one and please give me their views -i am 65 flat hitting short swinging very keen but mot great player !

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi there, Stephen! I haven’t had the chance to play with either of the oversized versions of the Babolat Pure Drive, but both the 107 and 110 will undoubtedly provide you with a larger sweet spot.

      One thing to keep in mind is that the frames are slightly longer with the 107 and 110. The standard Babolat Pure Drive is 27 inches in length, while the 107 is 27.2 inches, and the 110 is 27.5 inches in length. As a result, you’re going to gain a larger sweet spot along with some more power between the larger head size and extended length.

      Hopefully, you find what you’re looking for!

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
  2. M.Umut Özdemir
    M.Umut Özdemir says:

    Hello,
    My son started tennis at the age of 6. he is 7 now , playing for 1 year. He is still using his first racket, 21inch,wilson federer. He is 125cm high now and i think it is time to change racket. What size and brand will you offer? is changing original cord effects his play? he get used to play with orange balls since he started instead of red balls. is it a handicap?

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hey, thanks for the great question. At seven years old, your son is most likely ready to move up to the next racquet size at 23 inches in length, but this recommendation is based on height. Check out the following article on racquet sizing for kids:

      Kid’s Tennis Racquet Sizing

      There’s a handy chart included in the article. All you need to do is measure your son’s height and then find his height on the chart to determine the appropriate length tennis racquet. As for brand, I think that you’ll find that most top tennis brands like Wilson, Babolat, and Head all produce great tennis racquets. At your son’s age, it tends to be more about the color of the racquet than the technologies used to develop the racquet :) I’ll usually encourage parents to involve their children in the selection process to get their buy-in. Here are a few great options:

      • Wilson US Open Junior Tennis Racquet
      • Head Instinct Junior Tennis Racquet
      • Babolat Nadal 23 Junior Tennis Racquet

      As for the color of the tennis balls your son was playing with, I wouldn’t worry too much about that. With 10 and under tennis, kids will move from red balls (age 8 and under), to orange balls (age 9-10) and then green balls (age 11+). The goal of 10 and under tennis is to provide kids with equipment and court sizes that better match their age so that they have more fun and stay engaged, but it’s certainly not a requirement, and I don’t believe it will put your son at a disadvantage.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi, Pedrosyah. Thanks for the positive feedback and for stopping by the website!

      The Wilson BLX Pro Limited has a 110 square inch head size, 27.5-inch frame, and has a strung weight of only 9.3 oz, so I’d be more inclined to place this racquet in the power group. Have a great day!

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
  3. Benjamin Dubbink
    Benjamin Dubbink says:

    Would a Wilson Steam 99S fall in control, or power? I’ve been looking to find a new racquet because my Babolat Pure Control snapped its frame. The Steam looks nice for my style, I just want a second opinion.

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi, Benjamin! Sorry to hear about your Babolat frame – that’s a major bummer. Of course, it’s always fun to test drive new tennis racquets :)

      I’d place the Wilson Steam 99S somewhere in between control and power. I realize that might not be the exact answer you’re looking for, but compared to your old Babolat frame, the following characteristics would tend to help generate a bit more power:

      • The head size is 1sq inch larger
      • It’s stiffness rating is 7 points higher
      • It’s swingweight is 20 points higher

      However, there’s one caveat. The Wilson Steam 99S has a very open string pattern with five fewer crosses than your old tennis racquet, which allows for increased spin and, therefore, arguably a greater sense of control. I think you’d find the control factor relatively similar between the racquets with the Babolat edging out the Wilson in this bucket – they access control in different ways.

      If you are seriously considering the Wilson Steam 99S, I’d strongly urge you to demo the racquet first. I think you’ll find that the open string pattern is going to provide you with a pretty unique hitting experience, which may end being a love/hate scenario.

      Hopefully, that helps. If you do end up demoing the Wilson Steam, I’d love for you to stop by and share your experience.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hey, Benjamin. I think it’s safe to say that if you don’t change your racquet, then you’re game won’t change all that much. There are two ways I’d look at this.

      First, if you liked your Babolat Pure Control then I might say “if it ain’t’ broke, don’t fix it” :) I’d be more inclined to focus on my technique, fitness, and mental training than worrying about finding a new racquet especially if I liked my old one. I may also be less inclined to switch my racquet if I was just about to head into a tennis season where I played competitive high school or college tennis. Instead, I’d prefer to try and make that switch during the off-season where I’d have time to get more familiar with my new racquet.

      On the other hand, if you’re not necessarily in love with your old Babolat and you’re not playing competitively with an important season coming up, then the unfortunate break of your existing racquet provides you with a great opportunity to explore new racquets. Here are some questions you might use to help guide the process of finding a new tennis racquet:

      • What do you like and dislike about your old racquet?
      • What’s your level of play?
      • What style of play do you have?
      • How much would you like to spend?
      • How often do you play tennis?
      • What type of surface do you usually play on?
      • Do you have an affinity toward a certain brand of racquets?

      The combined answers to these questions would help guide the decision-making process. For example, if there were only minor dislikes of your existing racquet and it felt like your current racquet suited your style of play, then it might make more sense to consider slight modifications to your existing racquet. For example, adjusting the weight/balance with minor tweaks or selecting a different type of tennis string that would give you more power, control, spin, feel, etc.

      However, if you really didn’t like your old racquet and it generally wasn’t suited to your style and level of play, then you’d want to start down the road of researching and identifying tennis racquets that matched your preferences until you had 2-3 or so racquets in mind. Then I’d strongly encourage you to demo those racquets and narrow down from there.

      Let me know if you have any follow-up questions – I’d be happy to help.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
  4. Keaton J.
    Keaton J. says:

    Hey there! I have been playing tennis for about two years now, and I’ve used the first raquet I ever purchased since. Now, my highschool season is about to start so I am looking for something that better fits my power-hitter, baseliner playing style. I’m looking for something a bit longer, due to my size, and something a bit head-heavy to get the power I need into my swings. Any suggestions for a specific racquet or brand?

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi, Keaton. Thanks for dropping by! I’d love to see if I can help. To start, it would be helpful if you could answer a few questions:

      • What tennis racquet do you currently use? (brand, model, head size, etc.)
      • What do you like and dislike about your old racquet?
      • What’s your level of play?
      • What style of play do you have?
      • How much would you like to spend?
      • How often do you play tennis?
      • Do you primarily play on hard court?
      • Do you prefer a certain brand of racquets?

      Also, does your high school tennis team compete in the fall, or does your season officially start in the spring?

      Looking forward to your reply.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      Reply
      • Keaton J.
        Keaton J. says:

        Hey Jon!
        -Currently, I play with a Head TiS2.
        -I really love the length and weight, but the head is a bit larger than I’d like.
        -Like I said, I tend to stay at the baseline and get some power into my swings.
        -I’d prefer to stay under $140
        -I play about 2 to 3 time a week.
        -I play on hard courts almost 99% of the time.
        -I’d prefer to stay Head, but some friends say I should try Babolat.
        The team doesn’t officially compete until February, but id like to get the raquet now so I can get settled in with it. I really appreciate the help!!!

        Reply
        • TennisCompanion
          TennisCompanion says:

          Awesome, thanks for your reply, Keaton! I figured your season wouldn’t officially start until next year but didn’t want to make any assumptions. It looks like you’re right on track with your timing and finding a new tennis racquet.

          Before I jump in, there are two areas you will likely need to make a compromise that I figured I’d point out:

          1. The Head Ti.S2 is a super lightweight tennis racquet at only 8.6 oz that tends to be more common with oversized power-oriented tennis racquets. As a result, it’s likely that if you want to go with a smaller head, you’re going to have to be willing to move up slightly in the weight of your racquet. I don’t think this will be a big deal for you, but I wanted to point it out at least.
          2. Second, unless you’re buying used, it’s relatively challenging to stay under the $140 mark. With that said, one of my recommendations is priced right within your budget, but hopefully, you’re a bit flexible there.

          With that in mind, there are a few things I primarily took into consideration as part of the following recommendations.

          • Head size: from your comment, this appeared to be your primary dislike, so I found racquets that fell below the 102 square inch head size that the Ti.S2 has, but didn’t drop too far down because you’re already used to a larger head size. In other words, I didn’t want the transition to be jarring for you.
          • Power: it seemed like you enjoyed a big-hitting game and might be disappointed with a racquet that didn’t provide you with easy access to power so I found a few racquets that would provide you with exactly that.
          • Brand: since you like Head racquets, I made two of my recommendations in the Head family of racquets, but provided a third Babolat option since you mentioned that brand too. This racquet also conveniently fell within your price range.

          Here are the three tennis racquets that I dug up for you:

          • Head Graphene XT Extreme Lite
          • Head Graphene XT Instinct Rev Pro
          • Babolat Drive Lite

          Check them out – hopefully you find something that looks interesting.

          Also, since you’re in the market for a new racquet, I did want to mention the importance of the tennis string you use. Many players will spring for a new racquet and then buy the cheapest tennis strings they can find. While there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that, you may not see the performance you’re looking for, so I’d encourage you to do some research on your tennis strings too.

          Here are a few articles that should help you out:

          ~ All the best, Jon

          Reply
          • Keaton J.
            Keaton J. says:

            Thanks for the all the help!!!!
            I was actually already checking out some strings, so I appreciate those few websites. I’ll be sure to let you know if I have any more questions.

            Best wishes,
            Keaton Johnson

          • Keaton Johnson
            Keaton Johnson says:

            Hey Jon!
            After a couple weeks of being back ordered, racquets finally came in for demo. I’ve really fallen in love with the Babolat Pure Drive Lite, The rev pro is also great, but the tension is a little low for my liking. I’ll let you know what I decide on!
            Thanks again for the help,
            Keaton

  5. Cindy
    Cindy says:

    Hi John,
    I just started playing tennis this summer. I am using Head (s2 larger head and longer length, titanium) . Do you think that would be a good raquet for me to use? Looking forward for your advice. Thanks

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi, Cindy! Congratulations on starting to play tennis – that’s amazing and thank you for your question :)

      As a new player, I wouldn’t worry too much about your tennis racquet just yet. The important part is your out there learning, absorbing new information, and hopefully having as much as fun as possible. With that said, I do think the Head Ti.S2 is a great starter racquet if that’s what you have at your disposal.

      Here are a few reasons that I believe this is a good racquet for you:

      • It’s larger 102 square inch head size will allow for higher margin for error and give you a bigger sweet spot
      • At 8.6 oz the frame will be easy to manuver
      • The Longer 27.5-inch frame (.5 inches longer than a typical racquet) will help you more easily generate a bit more power

      As you get more comfortable with your game, you may want to explore other tennis racquets, but for now, I think the Head Ti.S2 will work great for you.

      ~ All the best, Jon

      PS – what a coincidence… Keaton, who commented right above you, is playing with the same tennis racquet ;)

      Reply
  6. Lynn
    Lynn says:

    Hi there, I have a head Titanum Ti s 6. I was wanting to purchase a head tweener racquet. Unsure what to buy. Can you please help me.

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Lynn,

      Happy to provide a few recommendations. Before I jump into that, would you mind sharing some note son your Head Titanium Ti.S6?

      • What do you like about it?
      • What do you dislike about it?
      • What are you hoping to gain by making a switch?
      • What type of game do you have?

      Looking forward to helping provide a few recommendations.

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  7. roni
    roni says:

    Hi! My son is 10 years old. He started playing tennis 2 years ago. His racquet is Wilson Roger Federer 25. But its time to change it. Today he tried Head Instinct Graphene Xt Rev Pro. But he wasnt excited. He told that is very difficult to play with it , and that he has pain in the had. Please can you give me some advice , should I buy Wilson again, or it doesnt matter. Which model is good for him , 150cm high. An year ago he brokes his hand and I dont want to supercharge the hand.Sorry for my English!

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Roni,

      Thanks for stopping by and dropping a comment. Your son is right on the cusp of potentially being able to handle a full-size 27-inch tennis racquet, but from your notes, it may be a bit premature.

      There are a few things to keep in mind here. First, moving from the Wilson Roger Federer 25 to the 27-inch head instinct is that the extra length (which is substantial at his age), is going to be more challenging to maneuver. Second, the materials and build quality of the Head Instinct is much stiffer, so the feel is going to change as well.

      My recommendation based on the information you’ve provided would be to bump your son up to a 26-inch tennis racquet, but not jump to the full-size just yet – there’s no reason to rush it. Once he gets used to the 26-inch and grows a bit more, moving to the 27-inch should be much more comfortable.

      Here are two popular options you might consider:

      • Babolat Nadal 26 Junior
      • Head Radical 26 Junior

      Best of luck, and here’s hoping you find something comfortable for your son!

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  8. Arsalaan Aijaz
    Arsalaan Aijaz says:

    Hi
    I have a Babolat drive Z lite tennis racquet. First question is that my racquet is tweeter, control or power. And second is that I should buy Babolat pure drive lite or aero pure drive Nadal 2017. I want tweener type racquet for me.

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Arsalaan,

      I’d categorize your Babolat Drive Z Lite as a tweener style tennis racquet.

      I’d be happy to help you think about whether the Babolat Pure Drive Lite or Aero Pro would be a better fit for you, but in order to help, it would be best if you could share what you like and dislike about your current frame. In some ways, the Babolat Pure Drive might be the obvious answer if you already like your existing racquet. Let me know and we can hash it out.

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  9. Abishek
    Abishek says:

    Hi Jon

    I have been playing tennis for 3-4 years now but only as a beginner and as an occasional hobby. However, I’m starting to take the sport more seriously and I have noticed that my level of play has improved greatly and I am able to keep up with much more advanced players. The racket I have used so far have just been random Wilsons I bought buy from a store. I never really looked at specific brands or styles simply because my goal all these years was just to have fun. I was wondering if you could suggest a racket or two to check out that might help improve my game further?

    I am about 6’1, skinny (not capable of too much power) and pretty much stay on the baseline all the time.

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Abishek,

      Absolutely – happy to provide a few recommendations. Based on what you’ve described, you’d do well with a power or game improvement racquet. Here are a few options you might consider:

      • Babolat Pure Drive 107
      • Wilson Clash 108
      • Wilson Triad XP5 Racquet
      • Head Graphene 360 Instinct Lite
      • Head Titanium Ti.S5 Comfort Zone

      I’d recommend you read up on each and then pick a few to demo. You’re likely going to notice a fairly substantial difference from your current racquet, but it should be a fun process.

      I would love to hear what you think once you have a chance to play with any of them.

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  10. Francisco
    Francisco says:

    Hi! This thread hasn’t been updated in a while but it’s exactly what I was looking for. I was recently diagnosed with a SLAP lesion (shoulder injury) and I feel like my Head Radical MP Youtek 295g might not be the most adequate for me since it vibrates too much. Someone recommended me to buy the latest Babolat Pure Drive. Any tips/recommendation?
    Thank you very much!

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Francisco,

      Sorry to hear about the shoulder injury. Happy to help point you in the right direction.

      A good starting point would be to check out my article on racquet stiffness. I think that would help shed some light on how that attribute affects comfort. Another one to review would be considering the strings you’re using with multifilament being a great option for comfort – check this guide out.

      As for a few recommendations, here are a few I think are worth you checking out. Each features a mid-plus head and tighter string pattern like your Radical MP, except for the Clash, which has a 16×19 pattern. However, I think the Clash is worth checking out for comfort.

      • Wilson Blade 98 18×20 v7
      • Wilson Clash 98
      • Head MicroGel Radical
      • Head Graphene 360+ Gravity MP

      Good luck with the search!

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Mike,

      It’s a little tricky to provide a racquet recommendation without having a bit more information. If you can, I’d love to hear what racquet you’re currently using, what you like and dislike about it, and your level and style of play. That info would help me point you in the right direction.

      However, speaking more generally, I’d stay away from power racquets and find something that falls into one of the other categories: tweener, control, or modern player’s racquets. As a general rule of thumb, you’ll be looking for a racquet that has a lower stiffness rating, which will tend to be easier on your arm.

      A few racquet’s that are great options for intermediate players seeking comfort include:

      • Wilson Clash
      • Prince Phantom Pro
      • Head MicroGel Radical
      • Donnay Formula 100 Hexacore

      As for strings, my most frequent recommendations for strings and tennis elbow are multifilament. Natural gut is also a great option, but their pricey, so tend to not fall in everyone’s budget.

      Here are a few to check out:

      • Wilson NXT
      • Babolat Xcel
      • Tecnifibre NRG2
      • Tecnifibre X-One Biphase

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  11. Beth Lawrence
    Beth Lawrence says:

    Hi Jon, I am coming back to play after a 3 year break because of tennis elbow! Finding an elbow friendly racquet that I can get that stiff power and control I like is hard. And I realize all of these are not good for the arm! I’m a female, 51years old and 5 ft tall. I have played competitive tennis since I was a child. I have long baseline strokes. The last racquet I played with was Dunlop 500G. But played with Head racquets growing up. There are so many new components in a racquet now!. Do you have any suggestions for me on racquet and strings to try? Thanks so much! Beth

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Beth,

      Welcome back to the game, and sorry to hear about your tennis elbow struggles.

      Here are a few racquet’s that I think your mind find up your alley:

      • Wilson Clash 108
      • Wilson Triad XP3 or XP5
      • Head MicroGEL Radical Oversize

      I think you’d find each of those worth a demo. As for strings, here are a few softer multifilaments to check out:

      • Wilson NXT
      • Babolat Xcel
      • Tecnifibre NRG2
      • Tecnifibre X-One Biphase

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  12. DAREYL VAZ
    DAREYL VAZ says:

    Hi..I am a fairly decent player. I like to hit with good depth with power and top spin. I have been using the wilson sledgehammer purple racquet for about 23 years. Since then I have been trialing different new racquets with more modern technology but unfortunately cannot replicate the feel power or spin of my sledgehammer…I am kind of at a loss now because it will be difficult to get another sledgehammer. I string at 58 lbs. I have been doing a lot of research and gaining more knowledge on different aspects and I believe I like the head heavy rackets. Can you suggest some. Thank you

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Dareyl,

      Thanks for dropping in and posting a question.

      Happy to recommend a few alternatives to your older Sledgehammer. Here are a few that are all in the ‘Power’ family of tennis racquets and feature head heavy balance.

      • Wilson Hyper Hammer: 11pts HH
      • Head Graphene 360 Instinct PWR: 10pts HH
      • Head Titanium Ti.S6: 8pts HH
      • Head Titanium Ti.S6 comfort Zone: 7pts HH

      Each of those is popular within the crowd that enjoys this type of racquet, so I think you’ll find a demo of a few of these would be worth your while.

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  13. Jacob Bercovitz
    Jacob Bercovitz says:

    Hello,
    I’m currently using Prince tour 100 EXO3 (old) I would like to get a new racquet with a little more power and stiffness of around 65 since I had a tennis elbow a while ago. would you recommend the Volkl V-Sense V1 Pro.? or any other……. I do not like the thick frames

    Thanks.

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Jacob,

      Thanks for the note. Happy to provide a few recommendations for you.

      I do think the Volkl V-Sense V1 Pro would be worthy of checking out, based on the specs you noted. Here are two other’s you might find interesting and should offer a bit more power without being overbearing:

      • Head Graphene 360+ Gravity Pro
      • Yonex VCORE Pro 100 300

      Good luck with the search!

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  14. Mahmood
    Mahmood says:

    Thank you for this well explained article and it’s amazing to see the thorough advice you provide to people commenting. This info has helped me select my first tennis racket. Well done.

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Mahmood,

      Thanks so much for taking the time to let me know you enjoyed the article. Much appreciate and glad it helped you find your first racquet :)

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  15. Shyaam07
    Shyaam07 says:

    This article helps me to find the right kind of racquet for my game. I am more kind of intermediate player and like to improve my game
    Do you prefer Babolat pure drive(2018)??

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi there,

      The Babolat Pure Drive is an excellent racquet that can work well for intermediate to advanced players.

      Are there any questions or concerns you have about making the move to this racquet?

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply
  16. Muhammad Aneeque
    Muhammad Aneeque says:

    Hi!

    Loved your review of the types of tennis rackets and agree with your point that in the end, it’s all about personal choice. But professional help does help to shorten the process.

    I have been playing tennis for about 10 years now and would categorise myself as a fairly advanced player. I am a flat baseliner with a tendency to come to the net when required and a single-handed backhand. For the past couple of years, I have been experiencing pain in my playing hand and can’t seem to shrug it off. I have tried taking a break, muscle toning and even changed my racket and strings.

    Currently, I am playing with Wilson Clash 98 strung at 50lbs (Wilson NXT Comfort 16 gauge) which provided me with some comfort but after some time again started experiencing the pain. Previously I was playing with Wilson ProStaff 97 CV strung at 55lbs (Technifibre NRG2 16 gauge). The pain has caused me to change my style and forego my flat serve due to which I cannot play my best tennis.

    Can you please recommend any solution to the problem I am facing?

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Muhammad,

      Thanks for the feedback and for taking the time to share your struggle. First off, I’m sorry to hear you’re in pain.

      From a gear standpoint, it looks like you’re on the right track. The Wilson Clash 98 and its low stiffness rating make it a great option or type of tennis racquet for any players suffering from arm injuries such as tennis elbow, and Wilson NXT strung at 50lbs is a comfortable option as well.

      Unfortunately, gear isn’t always the culprit, and from what you’ve described, that very well may be the case. If you haven’t already, my recommendation would be to take some time with a local instructor to see if they can spot anything in your technique that may be causing you discomfort. If you’ve already gone down that path, then the next best step would be to see a doctor or physical therapist as there may be an underlying issue that can be corrected as well.

      Best of luck in solving the issue,
      Jon

      Reply
  17. matt
    matt says:

    Hey there, where do you think the Babolat Pure Aero fits on this list? I have just bought one as an upgrade from a power type racquet and I am trying to figure out how I should use it
    ie. advantages & disadvantages, features in design that favour playstyles, etc.

    Thanks
    -matt

    Reply
    • TennisCompanion
      TennisCompanion says:

      Hi Matt,

      Great question. I’d bucket the Babolat Pure Aero in the tweener category.

      The Pure Aero is particularly well-suited for aggressive baseline play and topspin.

      As far as disadvantages, it’s a little on the stiffer side and isn’t the best performer up at net but it’s a great racquet overall.

      All the best,
      Jon

      Reply

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