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Wimbledon Prize Money

2022 Breakdown & Historicals

By Jon Crim
Image Credit: Wimbledon

Wimbledon 2022, scheduled to take place June 27 – July 10, is right around the corner, and prize money is always a hot topic.

This year, Wimbledon set the tournament’s prize money at £40,350,000 or $48,948,585. This amount marks the tournament’s largest purse, up 15.2% from 2021 and 6.2% over 2019 before the pandemic.

Despite the ATP and WTA stripping Wimbledon of their ranking points for 2022, prize money exceeds the previous year’s level, underscoring the tournament’s commitment to players. Keep reading for a complete breakdown.

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How Wimbledon is Funded

Wimbledon, or The All England Tennis & Croquet Club (ALTEC), is a highly prestigious and exclusive tennis club with only 500 full, life, and honorary members, so it’s fair to question how The Club funds the tournament.

According to Forbes, the tournament generates money from sponsorships, broadcasting rights, tickets, concessions, and merchandise. In 2017, here’s how their $289 million in revenue broke down roughly.

A pie chart showing how Wimbledon generates revenue to fund prize money.

  • $160m broadcasting rights (55.4%)
  • $47m ticket sales (16.3%)
  • $47m sponsorships (16.3%)
  • $35m concessions and merchandise (12.1%)
  • $289m total (100%)

The Championships use these funds to pay staff, maintain the Club and its impeccable grounds, and pay players prize money.

If there’s a surplus in funds, 90% of it goes to the Lawn Tennis Association (LTA) to invest in British tennis.

It’s worth noting that Wimbledon earns less than some of the Grand Slam tournaments due to its dedication to a “clean court philosophy” where they don’t place advertisements throughout the grounds as is common at nearly all sporting events these days.

As a result, prize money isn’t as high as it could be. Here’s a look at the 2019 prize money for all four of the tournaments:

TournamentPrize MoneyUS Dollars
Australian Open$62,500,000$44,902,812
French Open€42,661,000$45,460,414
Wimbledon£38,000,000$47,461,430
US Open$57,238,700$57,238,700

For years Wimbledon has focused on a select few partners, like Slazenger, that appreciate the Club’s dedication to maintaining a signage-free environment that focuses on the Wimbledon brand while reducing distraction for the players.

Prize Money Distribution

Like other tennis tournaments, Wimbledon distributes its prize money to players based on performance. The further a player progresses through the event, the more money they make.

Here’s an example for gentlemen’s and ladies’ singles from 2021.

2021US DollarBritish PoundEuro
Winner$2,399,520£1,700,000€1,979,979.00
Runner-up$1,270,334£900,000€1,048,224.00
Semifinal$656,339£465,000€541,582.00
Quarterfinal$423,445£300,000€349,408.00
Round 4$255,478£181,000€210,810.00
Round 3$162,320£115,000€133,940.00
Round 2$105,861£75,000€87,352.00
Round 1$67,751£48,000€55,905.00

Wimbledon also distributes prize money at varying degrees depending on the event. Here’s how the totals for each discipline and qualifying broke out in 2021.

A pie chart showing how Wimbledon distributes prize money across events.

EventPrize MoneyPercent of Total
Singles£26,980,00077.1%
Doubles£4,256,00012.2%
Qualifying Singles£2,896,0008.3%
Wheelchair Events£516,0001.5%
Mixed Doubles£368,0001.1%
Total Prize Money£35,016,000100%

Unsurprisingly, these amounts correlate with the general popularity of the events, which would correspond with viewer demand.

Men vs. Women

On February 22, 2007, Wimbledon’s chairman, Tim Phillips, announced that the tournament would offer equal prize money to men and women starting that year and moving forward. That year the prize money was 700,000 for men’s and women’s singles.

Although the gap between pay had been closing between men and women for years leading up to 2007, The Championships were the last of the four Grand Slam tournaments to offer equal pay. Here’s when each major started offering equal prize money.

  • US Open: 1973
  • Australian Open: 2001
  • French Open: 2006
  • Wimbledon: 2007

Here’s a look at the prize money for five years leading up to 2007 for men’s and women’s singles.

TournamentMen’s SinglesWomen’s’ Singles
2002£525,000£486,000
2003£575,000£535,000
2004£602,500£560,500
2005£630,000£600,000
2006£655,000£625,000
2007£700,000£700,000

For years, Wimbledon sighted that men played best of five sets vs. best of three sets for the women, and men drew bigger audiences. However, these claims were unsubstantiated as uneven media coverage and recent audience data prove the women’s side is thriving despite inequality.

2022 Full Breakdown

Wimbledon has increased its prize money nearly every year since the Open Era began in 1968. However, 2021 marked the first year of a decline as the tournament recovered from the global COVID-19 pandemic, which forced The Championships to not run in 2020.

However, a new wrinkle presents itself in 2022. Due to Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, Wimbledon decided to decline entries for Russian and Belarusian players into the tournament. As a result, the ATP and WTA jointly decided to remove ranking points at Wimbledon.

As a result of the decision, many questioned whether Wimbledon would reduce prize money for 2022. However, as announced on June 9, 2022, they’ve increased it by 15.2% over 2021 and 6.2% over 2019.

The following tables showcase how prize money breaks down for each round of the singles, doubles, and mixed doubles events.

Men & Women Singles

US Dollar

Please note that all historical data for Wimbledon prize money in US dollars considers exchange rates on the day of the final for the years listed.

Round2022202120202019201820172016201520142013201220112010
Winner$2,423,360$2,399,520$2,954,247$2,976,230$2,871,688$2,589,231$2,939,751$3,019,904$2,380,456$1,785,437$1,770,994$1,513,203
Runner-up$1,272,264$1,270,334$1,477,123$1,488,115$1,435,844$1,294,616$1,469,875$1,509,952$1,190,228$892,719$885,497$756,601
Semifinal$648,248$656,339$739,190$743,396$717,922$647,308$734,938$754,976$595,114$446,359$442,749$378,301
Quarterfinal$375,620$423,445$369,595$371,698$358,961$323,654$376,851$387,783$304,996$225,120$221,374$189,150
Round 4$230,219$255,478$221,254$215,611$191,881$170,889$198,590$200,755$156,217$116,442$110,687$94,575
Round 3$145,401$162,320$139,541$132,277$117,478$103,569$120,405$121,826$93,730$60,356$55,344$47,288
Round 2$94,511$105,861$90,513$83,334$74,403$64,731$73,494$73,782$56,536$35,903$32,401$28,373
Round 1$60,584$67,751$56,571$51,588$45,686$38,838$45,347$46,328$34,963$22,512$18,515$17,024

British Sterling Pound

Round2022202120202019201820172016201520142013201220112010
Winner£2,000,000£1,700,000£2,350,000£2,250,000£2,200,000£2,000,000£1,880,000£1760000£1,600,000£1,150,000£1,100,000£1,000,000
Runner-up£1,050,000£900,000£1,175,000£1,125,000£1,100,000£1,000,000£940,000£880,000£800,000£575,000£550,000£500,000
Semifinal£535,000£465,000£588,000£562,000£550,000£500,000£470,000£440,000£400,000£287,500£275,000£250,000
Quarterfinal£310,000£300,000£294,000£281,000£275,000£250,000£241,000£226,000£205,000£145,000£137,500£125,000
Round 4£190,000£181,000£176,000£163,000£147,000£132,000£127,000£117,000£105,000£75,000£68,750£62,500
Round 3£120,000£115,000£111,000£100,000£90,000£80,000£77,000£71,000£63,000£38,875£34,375£31,250
Round 2£78,000£75,000£72,000£63,000£57,000£50,000£47,000£43,000£38,000£23,125£20,125£18,750
Round 1£50,000£48,000£45,000£39,000£35,000£30,000£29,000£27,000£23,500£14,500£11,500£11,250

Euro

Please note that all historical data for Wimbledon prize money in euros considers exchange rates on the day of the final for the years listed.

Round2022202120202019201820172016201520142013201220112010
Winner€2,330,270€1,979,979€2,620,983€2,543,522€2,502,673€2,344,391€2,670,834€2,216,346€1,855,718€1,450,006€1,215,752€1,207,146
Runner-up€1,223,391€1,048,224€1,310,492€1,271,761€1,251,337€1,172,196€1,335,417€1,108,173€927,859€725,003€607,876€603,573
Semifinal€623,347€541,582€655,804€635,315€625,668€586,098€667,708€554,086€463,929€362,502€303,938€301,787
Quarterfinal€361,191€349,408€327,902€317,658€312,834€293,049€342,378€284,599€237,764€182,827€151,969€150,893
Round 4€221,375€210,810€196,295€184,264€167,224€154,730€180,423€147,337€121,781€94,566€75,984€75,447
Round 3€139,816€133,940€123,800€113,045€102,382€93,776€109,391€89,409€73,069€49,017€37,992€37,723
Round 2€90,880€87,352€80,302€71,219€64,842€58,610€66,771€54,149€44,073€29,158€22,243€22,634
Round 1€58,256€55,905€50,189€44,088€39,815€35,166€41,199€34,001€27,256€18,283€12,710€13,580

Men & Women Doubles (Per Pair)

Player(s)DollarsBritish PoundEuroChange from 2021
Winner$677,014£540,000€635,51112.5%
Runner-up$338,507£270,000€317,75512.5%
Semi-finalists$169,254£135,000€158,87812.5%
Quarter-finalists$84,000£67,000€78,85011.7%
Third Round$41,373£33,000€38,83710.0%
Second Round$25,075£20,000 €23,5375.3%
First Round $15,672£12,500€14,7114.2%

Mixed Doubles (Per Pair)

Player(s)DollarsBritish PoundEuroChange from 2021
Winner$155,445£124,000€145,85524.0%
Runner-up$77,722£62,000€72,92724.0%
Semi-finalists$38,861£31,000€36,46424.0%
Quarter-finalists$20,057£16,000€18,82033.3%
Second Round$9,402£7,500€8,82225.0%
First Round $4,701£3,750 €4,411150.0%

Prize Money by Year

Here’s a recap of historic data for Wimbledon prize money for winners across singles, doubles, and mixed doubles. All data is presented in British Sterling Pounds.

A line graph showing growth of prize money at Wimbledon for men's and women's singles.

TournamentMen’s SinglesMen’s DoublesWomen’s’ SinglesWomen’s DoublesMixed DoublesTotal
1968£2,000£800£750£500£450£26,150
1969£3,000£1,000£1,500£600£500£33,370
1970£3,000£1,000£1,500£600£500£41,650
1971£3,750£750£1,800£450£375£37,790
1972£5,000£1,000£3,000£600£500£50,330
1973£5,000£1,000£3,000£600£500£52,400
1974£10,000£2,000£7,000£1,200£1,000£97,100
1975£10,000£2,000£7,000£1,200£1,000£114,875
1976£12,500£3,000£10,000£2,400£2,000£157,740
1977£15,000£6,000£13,500£5,200£3,000£222,540
1978£19,000£7,500£17,100£6,500£4,000£279,023
1979£20,000£8,000£18,000£6,930£4,200£277,066
1980£20,000£8,400£18,000£7,276£4,420£293,464
1981£21,600£9,070£19,400£7,854£4,770£322,136
1982£41,667£16,666£37,500£14,450£6,750£593,366
1983£66,600£26,628£60,000£23,100£12,000£978,211
1984£100,000£40,000£90,000£34,700£18,000£1,461,896
1985£130,000£47,500£117,000£41,100£23,400£1,934,760
1986£140,000£48,500£126,000£42,060£25,200£2,119,780
1987£155,000£53,730£139,500£46,500£27,900£2,470,020
1988£165,000£57,200£148,500£49,500£29,700£2,612,126
1989£190,000£65,870£171,000£56,970£34,200£3,133,749
1990£230,000£94,230£207,000£81,510£40,000£3,819,730
1991£240,000£98,330£216,000£85,060£41,720£4,010,970
1992£265,000£108,570£240,000£93,920£46,070£4,416,820
1993£305,000£124,960£275,000£108,100£53,020£5,048,450
1994£345,000£141,350£310,000£122,200£60,000£5,682,170
1995£365,000£149,540£328,000£129,300£63,500£6,025,550
1996£392,500£160,810£353,000£139,040£68,280£6,465,910
1997£415,000£170,030£373,500£147,010£72,200£6,884,952
1998£435,000£178,220£391,500£154,160£75,700£7,207,590
1999£455,000£186,420£409,500£167,770£79,180£7,595,330
2000£477,500£195,630£430,000£176,070£83,100£8,056,480
2001£500,000£205,000£462,500£189,620£87,000£8,525,280
2002£525,000£210,000£486,000£194,250£88,500£8,825,320
2003£575,000£210,000£535,000£194,250£88,500£9,373,990
2004£602,500£215,000£560,500£200,000£90,000£9,707,280
2005£630,000£218,500£600,000£203,250£90,000£10,085,510
2006£655,000£220,690£625,000£205,280£90,000£10,378,710
2007£700,000£222,900£700,000£222,900£90,000£11,282,710
2008£750,000£230,000£750,000£230,000£92,000£11,812,000
2009£850,000£230,000£850,000£230,000£92,000£12,550,000
2010£1,000,000£240,000£1,000,000£240,000£92,000£13,725,000
2011£1,100,000£250,000£1,100,000£250,000£92,000£14,600,000
2012£1,150,000£260,000£1,150,000£260,000£92,000£16,060,000
2013£1,600,000£300,000£1,600,000£300,000£92,000£22,560,000
2014£1,760,000£325,000£1,760,000£325,000£96,000£25,000,000
2015£1,880,000£340,000£1,880,000£340,000£100,000£26,750,000
2016£2,000,000£350,000£2,000,000£350,000£100,000£28,100,000
2017£2,200,000£400,000£2,200,000£400,000£100,000£31,600,000
2018£2,250,000£450,000£2,250,000£450,000£110,000£34,000,000
2019£2,350,000£540,000£2,350,000£540,000£116,000£38,000,000
2021£1,700,000£480,000£1,700,000£480,000£100,000£35,016,000
2022£2,000,000£540,000£2,000,000£540,000£124,000£40,350,000

Keep in mind that all data is in sterling pounds, the UK’s currency, so you’ll need to translate it to your native currency.

FAQs

Wimbledon prize money is a hot topic. Aside from what we’ve covered, here are some common questions about the subject.

Is Wimbledon prize money taxed?

Yes. Players are taxed on their earnings based on the country they receive prize money. Therefore, for Wimbledon, players are taxed at the United Kindom’s tax rate, which is 40-45% depending on a player’s winnings.

However, players usually don’t have to pay taxes on their money earned at Wimbledon to their local government due to a Double Tax Treaty, which prevents double taxation.

Do junior Wimbledon players win prize money?

No. Wimbledon junior tournaments are amateur events, so participants do not earn prize money.

Why did Wimbledon’s prize money go down in 2021?

Recovering from the pandemic and not running the tournament in 2020, Wimbledon reduced prize money by 5.2% in 2021 compared to 2019, when the event last ran.

However, the reduction only impacted the singles finalists and semi-finalists, and in some cases, there were increases. For example, qualifiers saw a 17.5% increase in prize money allocation.

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